Janice

Title:
Example: Technology Use Agreement
Text:
Example: Technology Use Agreement
On one level, ShareNet is an example of a highly successful district-level initiative to create a regional telecommunications network. The network involves 54 school districts in two states, 462 schools serving over 250,000 students, and 18,000 teachers.
Despite the impressive breadth of participation from schools and districts, when we look more closely at the network's impact on students and teachers, the picture is much less rosy because of severe limitations on the kind of network access available at most ShareNet schools.
Applications for Account and Terms and Conditions for Use of THSNet*
*Truman High School Network in Independence, MO.
Please read the following carefully before signing the attached contract. This is a legally binding document.
INTERNET access is now available to students and teachers at Truman High School. We are very pleased to bring this access to Truman High School and believe the THSNet offers vast, diverse and unique resources to both students and teachers. Our goal in providing this service to teachers and students is to promote educational excellence in the Independence Schools by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communication.
The THSNet is an electronic network which accesses the INTERNET. The INTERNET is an electronic highway connecting thousands of computers all over the world and millions of individuals subscribers. Students and teachers have access to:
electronic mail communication with people all over the world;
information and news from NASA as well as the opportunity to correspond with the scientists at NASA and other research institutions;
public domain and shareware software of all types;
discussion groups on a plethora of topics ranging from Chinese culture to the environment to music to politics;
access to many university library, catalogs, the Library of Congress, CAR and ERIC
With access to computers and people all over the world also comes the availability of material that may not be considered to be of educational value in the context of the school setting. THS have taken available precautions, which are limited, to restrict access to controversial materials. However, on a global network it is impossible to control all materials and an industrious user may discover controversial information. We (THS) only believe that the valuable information and interaction available on this worldwide network far outweighs the possibility that users may procure material that is not consistent with the educational goals of THS.
INTERNET access is coordinated through a complex association of government agencies, and regional and state network. In addition, the smooth operation of the network relies upon the proper conduct of the end users who must adhere to strict guidelines. These guidelines are provided here so that you are aware of the responsibilities you are about to acquire. In general this requires efficient, ethical and legal utilization of the network resources. If a THS user violates any of these provisions, his or her account on the THSNet will be terminated and future access could possible be denied. Your signature(s) on the attached contract is (are) legally binding and indicates the party (parties) who signed has (have) read the terms and conditions carefully and understand their significance.
THSNet - Terms and Conditions (4/14/94)
Acceptable Use - The purpose of NSFNet, which is the backbone network to the INTERNET, is to support research and education in and among academic institutions in the U.S. by providing access to unique resources and the opportunity for collaborative work. The use of your account must be in support of education and research and consistent with the educational objectives of the Independence School District. Use of other organization's networks or computing resources must comply with THS rules. Transmission of any material in violation of any U.S. or state regulation is prohibited. This includes, but is not limited to: copyrighted material, threatening or obscene material, or material protected by trade secret. Use for commercial activities by for-profit institutions is generally not acceptable. Use for product advertisement or political lobbying is also prohibited. Illegal activities are strictly prohibited.
Privileges - The use of THSNet is a privilege, not a right, and inappropriate use will result in a cancellation of those privileges. (Each student who receives an account will be part of a discussion with a THS faculty member pertaining to the proper use of the network.) Base upon the acceptable use guidelines outlined in this document, the system administrators will deem what is inappropriate use and their decision is final. Also, the system administrators may close an account at any time as required. The administration, faculty, and staff of THS may request the system administrator to deny, revoked, or suspend specific user accounts.
Netiquette - You are expected to abide by the general accepted rules of network etiquette. These include (but are not limited to) the following:
Be polite. Do not write or send abusive messages to others.
Use appropriate language. Do not swear, use vulgarities or any other inappropriate language.
Do not reveal your personal address, password or phone numbers of students or colleagues.
Note that electronic mail (e-mail) is not guaranteed to be private. People who operate the system do have access to all mail. Messages relating to or in support of illegal activities may be reported to the authorities.
Do not use the network in such a way that you would disrupt the use of the network by other users (e.g., downloading huge files during prime time; sending mass e-mail messages; annoying other user using the talk or write functions.
All communications and information accessible via the network should be assumed to be private property.
Implied - THS will not be responsible for any damages you suffer. This includes loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, mis-deliveries, or service interruptions caused by it's own negligence or your error or omissions. Use of any information obtained via THSNet is at your own risk. THS specifically deny any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its services.
Security - Security on any computer system is a high priority, especially when the system involves many users. If you feel you can identify a security problem on THSNet, you must notify a system administrator. Do not demonstrate the problem to other users. Do not give your password to any other individual. Attempts to log in to the system as any other user will result in cancellation of user privileges. Attempts to log in to THSNet as a system administrator will result in cancellation of user privileges. Any user identified as a security risk or having a history of problems with other computer systems may be denied access to THSNet.
Vandalism - Vandalism will result in cancellation of privileges. Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy data of another user, THSNet or any of the agency or other networks that are connected to THS, or the NSFNet INTERNET backbone. This includes, but is not limited to, the uploading or creation of computer viruses.
Updating Your User Information - THSNet may occasionally require new registration and account information from you to continue the service. You must notify THSNet of any changes in your account information (address, etc.). Currently, there are no user fees for this service.
Exception of Terms and Conditions - All terms and conditions as stated in this document are applicable to the Independence School District. These terms and conditions reflect the entire agreement of the parties and supersedes all prior oral or written agreements and understandings of the parties. These terms and conditions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State of Missouri, United States of America. Any Independence School District student or staff may apply for an INTERNET Account. To do so you must complete the attached contract and application. Students should return the contract to the person from whom they received the contract. Staff should return the contract to (Chuck Harris at) Truman High School. You may retain this copy of the Terms and Conditions for your files.
STUDENT
Last Name:
First Name:
Expected Year of Graduation from 12th Grade:
Class Period:
STUDENT CONTRACT AGREEMENT APPLICATION FORM
TRUMAN HIGH SCHOOL
INTERNET ACCOUNT
Directions: After reading the THSNet Application for Account and Terms and Conditions please read and fill out the appropriate portions of the following contract completely and legibly. The signature of a parent or guardian is also required. Please return the contract to your teacher. Any questions should be addressed to your teacher as well.
CONTRACT PORTION OF DOCUMENT
I have read the THSNet Terms and Conditions. I understand and will abide by the stated Terms and Conditions for THSNet. I further understand that violation of the regulations is unethical and may constitute a criminal offense. Should I commit any violation my access privileges may be revoked, school disciplinary action may be taken and/or appropriate legal action.
User Name (please print):
User Signature:
Date:
PARENT OR GUARDIAN (If the applicant is under the age of 18, a parent or guardian most also read and sign this agreement.)
As the parent or guardian of this student, I have read the Terms and Conditions for THSNet. I understand that this access is designed for educational purposes and THS has taken available precautions to eliminate controversial material. However, I also recognize it is impossible for THS to restrict access to all controversial materials and I will not hold them responsible for materials acquired on the network. Further, I accept full responsibility for supervision if and when my child's use is not in a school setting. I hereby give my permission to issue an account for my child and certify that the information contained on this form is correct.
Parent or Guardian (please print):
Signature:
Date:
Daytime Phone Number:
Evening Phone Number:
SPONSORING TEACHER. I have read the Terms and Conditions for THSNet and I agree to promote this agreement with the student. Because the student may use the network for individual work or in the context of another class, I cannot be held responsible for the student's use of the network. As the sponsoring teacher I do agree to instruct the student on acceptable use of the network and proper network etiquette.
Teacher's Name (please print):
Signature
Date:
APPLICATION PORTION OF DOCUMENT
Student's Full Name (please print):
Social Security Number:
(accounts cannot be ISSUED without this)
I expect to graduate from 12th grade in:
Year:
Your Home Address:
Home Phone:
When your account is established your teacher will notify you of your log-on code and user password. Thank you for your interest and support of this exciting new resource in the Independence Schools.
Comment:
AUP cited by US DOE 

Title:
Tips for Safe Traveling
Text:
Parents Guide to the Internet - November 1997
Tips for Safe Traveling
Like most parents, you probably have rules for how your children should deal with strangers, which TV shows, movies, and videos they're allowed to watch, what stores they're allowed to enter, and where and how far from home they're allowed to travel. It's important to make similar rules for your children's Internet use and to be aware of their online activities.
You'll also want to make sure that surfing the Net doesn't take the place of homework, social activities, or other important interests. You might even set an alarm clock or timer if you or your child tend to lose track of time. This section offers tips for ensuring that your children have safe, productive, and enjoyable experiences on the Internet.
Interacting with Others on the Internet
Just as we tell our children to be wary of strangers they meet, we need to tell them to be wary of strangers on the Internet. Most people behave reasonably and decently online, but some are rude, mean, or even criminal. Teach your children that they should:
Never give out personal information (including their name, home address, phone number, age, race, family income, school name or location, or friends' names) or use a credit card online without your permission.
Never share their password, even with friends.
Never arrange a face-to-face meeting with someone they meet online unless you approve of the meeting and go with them to a public place.
Never respond to messages that make them feel confused or uncomfortable. They should ignore the sender, end the communication, and tell you or another trusted adult right away.
Never use bad language or send mean messages online.
Also, make sure your children know that people they meet online are not always who they say they are and that online information is not necessarily private.
Limiting Children to Appropriate Content on the Internet
Even without trying, your children can come across materials on the Internet that are obscene, pornographic, violent, hate filled, racist, or offensive in other ways. One type of material--child pornography--is illegal. You should report it to the Center for Missing and Exploited Children by calling 1-800-THE LOST (843-5678) or going to http://www.missingkids.org/. While other offensive material is not illegal, there are steps you can take to keep it away from your children and out of your home.
Make sure your children understand what you consider appropriate for them. What kinds of sites are they welcome to visit? What areas are off limits? How much time can they spend, and when? How much money, if any, can they spend? Set out clear, reasonable rules and consequences for breaking them.
Make online exploration a family activity. Put the computer in the living room or family room. This arrangement involves everyone and helps you monitor what your children are doing.
Pay attention to games your older child might download or copy. Some are violent or contain sexual content.
Look into software or online services that filter out offensive materials and sites. Options include stand alone software that can be installed on your computer, and devices that label or filter content directly on the web. In addition, many Internet Service Providers and commercial online services offer site blocking, restrictions on incoming e-mail, and children's accounts that access specific services. Often, these controls are available at no additional cost. Be aware, however, children are often smart enough to get around these restrictions. Nothing can replace your supervision and involvement.
Find out what the Internet use policy is at your local library.
Ask about the Internet use policy at your child's school.
Encouraging Information Literacy
Show your children how to use and evaluate information they find on the Internet. Not all online information is reliable. Some individuals and organizations are very careful about the accuracy of the information they post, but others are not. Some even mislead on purpose. Remind your children not to copy online information and claim it's their own or copy software unless it is clearly labeled as free.
Help children understand the nature of commercial information, advertising, and marketing, including who created it and why it exists. Encourage them to think about why something is provided and appears in a specific way. Steer your children to noncommercial sites and other places that don't sell products specifically to children. It is important to be aware of the potential risks involved in going online, but it is also important to keep them in perspective. Common sense and clear guidelines are the place to start.
Comment:
DOE Guide for Parents 

Title:
U.S. Department of Education Internet Services Customer Survey
Text:
ED Internet Customer Survey
Comment:
US DOE Internet Survey 

Title:
Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2000
Text:
Anne Cattagni and Elizabeth Farris
This article was originally published as a Statistics in Brief report. The methodology section and standard error tables from the original report have been omitted. The sample survey data are from several surveys—listed at the end of this article—on advanced telecommunications and Internet access in U.S. public schools. These surveys were conducted through the NCES Fast Response Survey System (FRSS).
Since 1994, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has surveyed public schools to measure what proportion of them are connected to the Internet. These annual surveys enable the U.S. Department of Education to monitor the progress made by public schools in providing access for all students and teachers to information technology in their classrooms and schools. In the fall of each academic year, a new nationally representative sample of approximately 1,000 public schools has been surveyed about Internet access and, since 1996, about the types of Internet connections used. In 2000, questions were also asked about access to the Internet at times outside of regular school hours and on “acceptable use policies.”
How Much Progress Have Public Schools Made in Connecting to the Internet?
By the fall of 2000, almost all public schools in the United States had access to the Internet: 98 percent were connected. In comparison, 35 percent of public schools had access to the Internet in 1994 (table 1). Unlike in previous years, there were virtually no differences in school access to the Internet by school characteristics (e.g., poverty level1 and metropolitan status) in 1999 or 2000.
The increase in Internet access over the years may have been aided by the allocation of funds through the Education rate (E-rate) program. The E-rate program was established in 1996 to make services, Internet access, and internal connections available to schools and libraries at discounted rates based upon the income level of the students in their community and whether their location is urban or rural.2 As of February 28, 2001, $5.8 billion has been committed to E-rate applicants throughout the nation.3
Another key measure of Internet access in schools is the proportion of instructional rooms connected to the Internet.4 Since 1994, when 3 percent of instructional rooms had computers with Internet access, public schools have made consistent progress in this area: in fall 2000, 77 percent of instructional rooms were connected to the Internet, up from 64 percent in 1999 (table 2). However, in 2000, as in previous years, there were differences in Internet access in instructional rooms by school characteristics. For example, in schools with the highest concentration of students in poverty (75 percent or more students eligible for free or reduced-price school lunch), a smaller percentage of instructional rooms were connected to the Internet (60 percent) than in schools with lower concentrations of poverty (77 to 82 percent of instructional rooms). A similar pattern occurred by minority enrollment. In schools with the highest minority enrollment (50 percent or more), a smaller percentage of instructional rooms had Internet access (64 percent) than in schools with lower minority enrollment (79 to 85 percent of instructional rooms). Despite these continuing differences, however, the percentage of instructional rooms with Internet access increased between 1999 and 2000 in these schools—from 38 to 60 percent in schools with the highest concentration of poverty, and from 43 to 64 percent in schools with the highest minority enrollment.
What Is the Ratio of Students to Instructional Computers in Public Schools?
By the fall of 2000, the ratio of students to instructional computers in public schools had decreased to 5 to 1, the ratio that “many experts consider … a reasonable level for the effective use of computers within the schools” (President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology 1997, p. 14). The ratio improved from a national average of 6 to 1 in 1999 (not shown in tables).
Similarly, the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access in public schools improved from 9 to 1 in 1999 to 7 to 1 in 2000 (table 3). However, differences by school characteristics persisted. For example, the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access was still greater in schools with the highest concentration of students in poverty than in schools with the lowest concentration of poverty (9 to 1 compared with 6 to 1). Nonetheless, in schools with the highest concentration of poverty, the ratio of students to computers with Internet access improved from 17 to 1 in 1999 to 9 to 1 in 2000.
Table 1.—Percent of public schools with Internet access, by school characteristics: 1994–2000
1Data for combined schools are included in the totals and in analyses by other school characteristics but are not shown separately.
2Percent minority enrollment was not available for some cases. In 1994, this information was missing for 100 schools. In subsequent years, the missing information ranged from 46 schools (1995) to 6 (1997).
3The breakouts for the percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price school lunch have been revised for 2000 and therefore are different from the ones reported in previous Internet access reports.
4In this case, the estimate fell between 99.5 percent and 100 percent and therefore was rounded to 100 percent.
NOTE: All of the estimates in this report were recalculated from the raw data files using the same computational algorithms. Consequently, the estimates presented here may differ trivially (i.e., by 1 percent) from previously published results.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System, “Survey on Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, K–12,” FRSS 51, 1994; “Survey on Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, K–12,” FRSS 57, 1995; “Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1996,” FRSS 61, 1996; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1997,” FRSS 64, 1997; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1998,” FRSS 69, 1998; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1999,” FRSS 75, 1999; and “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000,” FRSS 79, 2000.
Table 2.—Percent of instructional rooms with Internet access in public schools, by school characteristics: 1994–2000
1Data for combined schools are included in the totals and in analyses by other school characteristics but are not shown separately.
2Percent minority enrollment was not available for some cases. In 1994, this information was missing for 100 schools. In subsequent years, the missing information ranged from 46 schools (1995) to 6 (1997).
3The breakouts for the percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price school lunch have been revised this year and therefore are different from the ones reported in previous Internet access reports.
NOTE: All of the estimates in this report were recalculated from the raw data files using the same computational algorithms. Consequently, the estimates presented here may differ trivially (i.e., by 1 percent) from previously published results.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System, “Survey on Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, K–12,” FRSS 51, 1994; “Survey on Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, K–12,” FRSS 57, 1995; “Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1996,” FRSS 61, 1996; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1997,” FRSS 64, 1997; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1998,” FRSS 69, 1998; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1999,” FRSS 75, 1999; and “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000,” FRSS 79, 2000.
Table 3.—Ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access in public schools, and percent of public schools allowing students to access the Internet outside of regular school hours, by school characteristics: 1998–2000
1Percentages are based on the 98 percent of public schools with Internet access in 2000.
2Data for combined schools are included in the totals and in analyses by other school characteristics but are not shown separately.
3Percent minority enrollment was not available for nine schools in 1998 and 2000.
4The breakouts for the percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price school lunch have been revised this year and therefore are different from the ones reported in previous Internet access reports.
NOTE: All of the estimates in this report were recalculated from the raw data files using the same computational algorithms. Consequently, the estimates presented here may differ trivially (i.e., by 1 percent) from previously published results.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System, “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1998,” FRSS 69, 1998; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1999,” FRSS 75, 1999; and “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000,” FRSS 79, 2000.
How Are Public Schools Connected to the Internet?
Over the years, changes have occurred in the type of network connections used by public schools and the speed at which they are connected to the Internet. In 1996, dial-up Internet connections were used by almost three-fourths (74 percent) of public schools having Internet access (Heaviside, Riggins, and Farris 1997). By 2000, schools tended to use faster dedicated-line Internet connections, such as 56Kb, T1/DS1, fractionalized T1, T3/DS3, and fractionalized T3 lines (table 4). Seventy-seven percent of the nation’s public schools that were connected to the Internet used dedicated lines, 11 percent used dial-up (not continuous) connections, and 24 percent of schools used other (continuous) connection types, including ISDN, wireless connections, and cable modems.5 There were differences by instructional level; secondary schools (86 percent) were more likely to use dedicated lines than elementary schools (74 percent).
Table 4.—Percent of public schools with Internet access using the following types of connections, by school characteristics: 1998–2000
1Includes 56Kb, T1/DS1, fractionalized T1, T3/DS3, and fractionalized T3 lines.
2Includes ISDN, wireless connections, and cable modems (generally continuous connections, similar to dedicated lines).
3Data for combined schools are included in the totals and in analyses by other school characteristics but are not shown separately.
4Percent minority enrollment was not available for nine schools in 1998 and 2000.
5The breakouts for the percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price school lunch have been revised this year and therefore are different from the ones reported in previous Internet access reports.
NOTE: Percentages are based on the percent of public schools having Internet access: 89 percent in 1998, 95 percent in 1999, and 98 percent in 2000. Percentages add to more than 100 because schools may use more than one type of connection.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System, “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1998,” FRSS 69, 1998; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1999,” FRSS 75, 1999; and “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000,” FRSS 79, 2000.
To What Extent Are Public Schools Making the Internet Available to Students Outside of Regular School Hours in 2000?
Making the Internet accessible outside of regular school hours allows students who would not otherwise have access to the Internet to use this resource for school-related activities like homework. In 2000, 54 percent of public schools with access to the Internet reported that computers with access to the Internet were available to students outside of regular school hours (table 3). Secondary schools were more likely to make the Internet available to students outside of regular school hours than elementary schools (80 percent compared to 46 percent). Similarly, large schools (1,000 or more students) were more likely to make the Internet accessible to students outside of regular school hours than medium-sized and small schools (79 percent compared with 53 and 49 percent, respectively). In addition, schools with the highest minority enrollment reported Internet availability outside of regular school hours more frequently than schools with the lowest minority enrollment (61 percent compared with 46 percent). Of the 54 percent of schools making the Internet available to students outside of regular school hours, 98 percent made it available after school, 84 percent before school, and 16 percent on weekends (figure 1).
Figure 1.—Percent of public schools allowing students to access the Internet outside of regular school hours giving students access after school, before school, and on weekends: 2000
NOTE: Percentages are based on 53 percent of all public schools (98 percent with Internet access multiplied by 54 percent allowing students to access the Internet at times other than regular school hours). Percentages add to more than 100 because schools may have more than one time of availability.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System, “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000,” FRSS 79, 2000.
How Are Public Schools Preventing Students From Accessing Inappropriate Material on the Internet in 2000?
Given the diversity of the information carried on the Internet, student access to inappropriate material is a major concern of many parents and teachers. In 2000, almost all public schools with Internet access (98 percent) had “acceptable use policies” (AUPs) and used various technologies or procedures, such as blocking or filtering software, an intranet system, honor codes for students, or teacher/staff monitoring, to control student access to inappropriate material on the Internet (not shown in tables). Across all types of schools, between 95 and 100 percent had AUPs. Of those schools with AUPs, 94 percent reported having student access to the Internet monitored by teachers or other staff members (figure 2). Three-fourths (74 percent) used blocking or filtering software, 64 percent had honor codes, and 28 percent used their intranet. As these numbers suggest, most of the schools (91 percent) used more than one procedure or technology as part of their policy (calculated from table 5). Fifteen percent of public schools used all of the procedures and technologies listed above; 29 percent used blocking/filtering software, teacher/staff monitoring, and honor codes; and 19 percent used blocking/filtering software and teacher/staff monitoring (table 5). In addition, 95 percent of public schools having AUPs used at least one of these technologies or procedures on all Internet-connected computers used by students (not shown in tables).
Figure 2.—Percent of public schools with acceptable use policies (AUPs) using the following technologies or procedures: 2000
NOTE: Percentages are based on 96 percent of all public schools (98 percent with Internet access multiplied by 98 percent having AUPs). Percentages add to more than 100 because schools may use more than one type of AUP.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System, “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000,” FRSS 79, 2000.
Table 5.—Percent of public schools with acceptable use policies (AUPs) using various combinations of procedures and/or technologies to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet: 2000
NOTE: Percentages are based on 96 percent of all public schools (98 percent with Internet access multiplied by 98 percent having AUPs).
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System, “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000,” FRSS 79, 2000.
Related Information
This survey is part of an overall NCES effort to track the availability and use of technology in schools. The references below contain the source information about publications for the series of public school surveys on advanced telecommunications and Internet access. In addition to collecting information from public schools, NCES surveyed private schools about advanced telecommunications in 1995 and 1999. NCES has also collected information on teachers’ use of technology. A report on this topic was released in summer 2000.
Footnotes
1Throughout this report, poverty level is measured by the percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.
2The poorest applicants receive the largest discounts (90 percent), and rural communities receive up to a 10 percent additional discount.
3The E-rate program funding commitment data were found at the Web site of the School and Libraries Division (SLD), Universal Service Administrative Company (http://www.sl.universalservice.org/whatsnew/).
4Instructional rooms include classrooms, computer and other labs, library/media centers, and any other rooms used for instructional purposes.
5Percentages add to more than 100 because schools may use more than one type of connection.
References and Related Reports
Bare, J., and Meek, A. (1998). Internet Access in Public Schools (NCES 98–031). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Heaviside, S., and Farris, E. (1997). Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Private Schools, K–12, Fall 1995 (NCES 97–394). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Heaviside, S., Farris, E., and Malitz, G. (1995). Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, K–12 (NCES 95–731). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Heaviside, S., Farris, E., and Malitz, G. (1996). Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools, 1995 (NCES 96–854). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Heaviside S., Riggins, T., and Farris, E. (1997). Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools, Fall 1996 (NCES 97–944). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Heaviside, S., Rowand, C., Hurst, D., and McArthur, E. (2000) . What Are the Barriers to the Use of Advanced Telecommunications for Students With Disabilities in Public Schools? (NCES 2000–042). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Levin, D., Hurst, D., and Burns, S. (2000). Computer and Internet Access in U.S. Private Schools and Classrooms: 1995 and 1998 (NCES 2000–044). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology, Panel on Educational Technology. (1997). Report to the President on the Use of Technology to Strengthen K–12 Education in the United States. Available: http://www.ostp.gov/PCAST/K-12ed.html
Riley, R., Holleman, F., and Roberts, L. (2000). eLearning: Putting a World-Class Education at the Fingertips of All Children. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology. Available: http://www.ed.gov/Technology/elearning/e-learning.pdf
Rowand, C. (1999). Internet Access in Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994–98 (NCES 1999–017). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Smerdon, B., Cronen, S., Lanahan, L., Anderson, J., Iannotti, N., and Angeles, J. (2000). Teachers’ Tools for the 21st Century: A Report on Teachers’ Use of Technology (NCES 2000–102). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Williams, C. (2000). Internet Access in Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994–99 (NCES 2000–086). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Data sources: The following surveys, all conducted through the NCES Fast Response Survey System: “Survey on Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, K–12,” FRSS 51, 1994; “Survey on Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, K–12,” FRSS 57, 1995; “Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1996,” FRSS 61, 1996; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1997,” FRSS 64, 1997; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1998,” FRSS 69, 1998; “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1999,” FRSS 75, 1999; and “Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000,” FRSS 79, 2000.
For technical information, see the complete report:
Cattagni, A., and Farris, E. (2001). Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994–2000 (NCES 2001–071).
Author affiliations: A. Cattagni and E. Farris, Westat.
For questions about content, contact Bernie Greene (bernard.greene@ed.gov).
To obtain the complete report (NCES 2001–071), call the toll-free ED Pubs number (877-433-7827), visit the NCES Web Site (http://nces.ed.gov).
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National Center for Education Statistics
Office of Educational Research & Improvement, U.S. Dept. of Education
(map) 1990 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006, USA, Phone: (202) 502-7300
Comment:
Education Statistics Quarterly -- National Center for Education Statistics. 

Title:
Appendix E, from Safeguarding Your Technology, NCES Publication 98-297 (National Center for Education Statistics)
Text:
Glossary
(Note: All terms are defined based on their use in this document.)
A
Acceptable use policy- A policy designed to limit the ways in which a computer or network can be used. Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) usually include explicit statements about the required procedures, rights, and responsibilities of a technology user. Users are expected to acknowledge and agree to all AUP stipulations as a condition of system use, as should be certified on the AUP by the user's signature.
Comment:
DOE definition of AUP 

Title:
3.08.04 - Acceptable Use Policy
Text:
Kaimuki High School
Acceptable Use Policy (AUP)
Internet Use, Electronic And Audiovisual Publications
Please read the following carefully before signing this document.
Computing facilities, local area networks and/or Internet access are available to students and teachers at Kaimuki High School. Our goal is to provide opportunities for the Kaimuki High School community to gain the technological skills necessary to have access to people and information beyond our campus and to further use this knowledge to design, create and display student work outside the boundaries of the classroom.
Kaimuki High School Computer and Audiovisual Facilities
Computer facilities for students and faculty are located in the library, computer labs, classrooms and offices. These facilities exist to enhance the educational programs we offer. With the availability of desktop and publishing facilities in the computer labs, we also have the opportunity to produce and publish student work through electronic and audiovisual media.
The Internet and Telecommunications
The Internet is an electronic network connecting thousands of computers all over the world and millions of individual subscribers. Through this network students and teachers have access to electronic mail, discussion groups on many topics, and information and news from a variety of sources.
Not all of this material may be considered to be of educational value in the context of the school setting; however, on a global network it is impossible to control all materials and a user may be presented information of questionable or controversial content. We firmly believe that the valuable information and interaction available on this worldwide network far outweigh the possibility that users may locate material that is not consistent with the educational goals of Kaimuki High School.
The smooth operation of the network relies upon the proper conduct of the end users who must adhere to strict guidelines. These guidelines are provided here so that you may become aware of the responsibilities you are about to acquire. In general this requires efficient, ethical and legal utilization of the network resources. If a user violates any of these provisions, his/her Internet access privileges will be revoked.
Kaimuki High School Acceptable Use Policy
Internet Use, Electronic And Audiovisual Publications
Statement of Agreement to Terms and Conditions
I understand and will abide by the terms and conditions for the use of the facilities of Kaimuki High School and access to the Internet for educational purposes only. I further understand that any violation of the regulations stated herein is unethical and may constitute a criminal offense. Should I commit any violation, my access privileges will be revoked, school disciplinary action and/or appropriate legal action will be taken.
User Name (Print) ____________________________________________________________________
User Signature: ___________________________________________________ Date _____/____/_____
Student _______(Yr. Grad:___________) Faculty _____ Staff _____
Parent or Guardian (If you are under the age of 18, a parent or guardian must also read and sign this agreement.)
As the parent or guardian of this student, I have read the terms and conditions for Kaimuki High School's facilities use and Internet access. I understand that this access is designed for educational purposes; however, I also recognize it is impossible to restrict access to all controversial materials and I will not hold Kaimuki High School responsible for materials acquired on the network. Further, I accept full responsibility for supervision if and when my child's use is not in a school setting. I hereby authorize Kaimuki High School to grant my child access to the Internet and certify that the information contained on this form is correct.
I also recognize that it is impossible for the State of Hawaii Department of Education, University of Hawaii, and/or Maui High Performance Computing Center to restrict access to all inappropriate, questionable, or damaging material(e.g., software viruses). I will not hold any of their employees, any of the institutions or networks providing access to the Internet responsible for the performance of this system or the content of any material acquired on the network.
The Department of Education is not responsible for any expenses incurred as a result of my child's participation in these activities.
By signing below, I agree to the following:
1) My child may have access to the Internet.
2) Any recordings of my child may be broadcast and there will be no financial or other
remuneration involved for either the initial or subsequent transmission or playback.
3) My child's work, which may or may not be accompanied by his/her name, e-mail
address, and/or photograph, may be electronically produced and displayed by Kaimuki High School.
Parent or Guardian (Print) ______________________________________________________________
Signature: _____________________________________________________ Date _____/_____/_____
Certifying Teacher (Must be signed if the applicant is a student.)
I have read the Terms and Conditions and agree to promote this agreement with the student. Because the student may use the network for individual work or in the context of another class, I cannot be held responsible for the student's use of the network. As the certifying teacher, I have instructed the student on the following: 1) the rudimentary use of computers to access and do searches on the internet, 2) electronic communication ethics and user responsibility, 3) telecommunications overview, and 4) Internet policies and guidelines.
Teacher's Name (Print) ________________________________________________________________
Teacher's Signature ______________________________________________ Date _____/_____/_____
Please read the following Terms and Conditions carefully.
Your signature indicates that you understand, accept, and intend to abide by them. (Return Signed AUP to sponsoring teacher.)
Terms and Conditions
1) Acceptable Use - KHS is providing Internet access to support the curricular goals of the school, and the use of Kaimuki High School's computing facilities and resources is consistent with the educational objectives of the school.
Chat and e-mail are restricted to school-related assignments/business ONLY! Chat and e-mail are not for personal use.
Transmission of any material that is in violation of federal or state law/regulation is prohibited. This includes, but is not limited to, annoying, libelous, threatening or obscene material and material protected by trade secret. Users shall respect all U.S. copyright laws and licensing agreements pertaining to material entered into and obtained via the system. Users shall make proper citations and not plagiarize any sources.
KHS also prohibits transmitting of pornography, unethical or illegal solicitation, and sexually explicit or inappropriate language/graphics/audio segments. Hate mail, harassment, discriminatory remarks, other antisocial behaviors, and chain letters are prohibited on the network.
Students doing legitimate research on controversial topics should do so with the guidance of a faculty member to be sure that KHS's acceptable use policies are being followed.
The network may be used to publicize products and services related to DOE instructional activities; however, use of the network for personal profit or gain is prohibited.
Unauthorized access to the Department of Education information systems, Internet or other networked computers is not permitted.
2) Privileges - The use of KHS's computing facilities, resources, and the Internet is a privilege, not a right. Inappropriate use of these resources will result in a cancellation of your privileges and other school disciplinary actions as deemed appropriate.
3) Privacy - Students' use of computers and attendant software will be subject to periodic checks by faculty or system operators. E-mail and internet use is not guaranteed to be private in our school setting. Messages relating to or in support of inappropriate or illegal activities will be reported to the authorities.
Users shall respect the privacy of others. Users shall not intentionally seek information on, obtain copies of, or modify files, other data, or passwords belonging to other users, or represent themselves as another user.
4) Etiquette - You are expected to abide by the generally accepted rules of computing and network etiquette. These include (but are not limited to) the following:
a) Be polite.
b) Use appropriate language. Do not swear, use vulgarities or any other inappropriate language.
c) Be careful about revealing your own personal information and do not reveal the home address or
phone numbers of other students or colleagues.
5) Vandalism - Vandalism will result in cancellation of privileges and school disciplinary action. Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy hardware, software, or data of the school or of any other user on the Internet. This includes, but is not limited to, the creation or uploading of computer viruses. Any reconfiguration of school computers without the express consent of the site administrator will be considered vandalism.
6) Responsibility - As members of the KHS community, you must remember that when you telecommunicate with individuals, groups, or institutions, you do so as an individual. You should not represent your views, ideas, questions, or actions as representing Kaimuki High School without specific permission from the principal or other administrator. Remember that you are always identifiable as a user of Kaimuki High School computers and you must therefore make it clear that your communication represents you and not the school. Contacts should lead to some justifiable educational purpose on the Internet. Students are required to report the receipt of any unsolicited communications to his/her sponsoring teacher or site supervisor immediately.
7) Warranties - Kaimuki High School makes no warranties of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for the service it is providing. Kaimuki High School will not be responsible for any damages you suffer. This includes loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, mis-deliveries, computer malfunction or service interruptions. Use of any information obtained via Kaimuki High School is at your own risk. Kaimuki High School specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its services.
8) Security - Security on any computer system is a high priority, especially when the system involves many users. If you feel you can identify a security problem, you must notify a system administrator.
Do not demonstrate the problem to other users.
Do not give your access information - login IDs, or passwords, to another person.
Do not use another individual's access information. Giving access information to anyone or attempting to login to a Kaimuki High School computer or network or to the Internet using another person's account will result in immediate cancellation of your user privileges.
9) Electronically-Displayed Student Work and Video Release - As part of the many technological applications employed across the curriculum, we publish a variety of teacher and student projects on the Internet and make recordings of selected student performances and presentations. The products are used exclusively for non-commercial, educational purposes, which may include open-circuit, closed-circuit or cable broadcast within or outside the state of Hawaii. All standards for appropriate behavior apply to participation in these projects also.
10) Exceptions to Terms and Conditions - All terms and conditions as stated in this document are applicable to Kaimuki High School's facilities and networks. These terms and conditions reflect the entire agreement of the parties and supersedes all prior oral or written agreements and understanding of the parties. These terms and conditions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State of Hawaii and the United States of America.
Disciplinary Action For Violation of Acceptable Use Policy
The previously listed acceptable use practices are not all inclusive, but only representative and illustrative. A user who commits an act of misconduct that is not listed here may also be subject to disciplinary action.
***************************************************************************************
Students should sign and also have their parent/guardian and their certifying teacher sign the Statement of Agreement to Terms & Conditions and then give the Statement of Agreement to their Certifying Teacher.
Parts of this document and policies were adapted from the following sources:
1. MPI Acceptable Use Policy
2. Pearl City Complex Internet Acceptable Use Policy
3. DOE Internet Access Regulations 2170.1
4. Moanalua Complex Schools Internet Access Acceptable Use, Draft
Kaimuki High School
May 1, 2000
[Return to Kaimuki High School Home Page]
Comment:
Kaimuki High School 

Title:
IDOE>OLR
Text:
AUP Model
{SCHOOL DISTRICT} Policy on District-Provided Access to Electronic Information, Services, and Networks
Freedom of expression is an inalienable human right and the foundation for self-government. Freedom of expression encompasses the right to freedom of speech and the corollary right to receive information. Such rights extend to minors as well as adults. Schools facilitate the exercise of these rights by providing access to information regardless of format or technology. In a free and democratic society, access to information is a fundamental right of citizenship.
In making decisions regarding student access to the Internet, the {SCHOOL DISTRICT} considers its own stated educational mission, goals, and objectives. Electronic information research skills are now fundamental to preparation of citizens and future employees. Access to the Internet enables students to explore thousands of libraries, databases, bulletin boards, and other resources while exchanging messages with people around the world. The District expects that faculty will blend thoughtful use of the Internet throughout the curriculum and will provide guidance and instruction to students in its use. As much as possible, access from school to Internet resources should be structured in ways which point students to those which have been evaluated prior to use. While students will be able to move beyond those resources to others that have not been previewed by staff, they shall be provided with guidelines and lists of resources particularly suited to learning objectives.
Outside of school, families bear responsibility for the same guidance of Internet use as they exercise with information sources such as television, telephones, radio, movies, and other possibly offensive media.
Students utilizing District-provided Internet access must first have the permission of and must be supervised by the {SCHOOL DISTRICT}'s professional staff. Students utilizing school-provided Internet access are responsible for good behavior on-line just as they are in a classroom or other area of the school. The same general rules for behavior and communications apply.
The purpose of District-provided Internet access is to facilitate communications in support of research and education. To remain eligible as users, students' use must be in support of and consistent with the educational objectives of the {SCHOOL DISTRICT}. Access is a privilege, not a right. Access entails responsibility.
Users should not expect that files stored on school-based computers will always be private. Electronic messages and files stored on school-based computers may be treated like school lockers. Administrators and faculty may review files and messages to maintain system integrity and insure that users are acting responsibly.
The following uses of school-provided Internet access are not permitted:
a. to access, upload, download, or distribute pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material;
b. to transmit obscene, abusive, sexually explicit, or threatening language;
c. to violate any local, state, or federal statute;
d. to vandalize, damage, or disable the property of another individual or organization;
e. to access another individual's materials, information, or files without permission; and,
f. to violate copyright or otherwise use the intellectual property of another individual or organization without permission.
Any violation of District policy and rules may result in loss of District-provided access to the Internet. Additional disciplinary action may be determined at the building level in keeping with existing procedures and practices regarding inappropriate language or behavior. When and where applicable, law enforcement agencies may be involved.
The {SCHOOL DISTRICT} makes no warranties of any kind, neither expressed nor implied, for the Internet access it is providing. The District will not be responsible for any damages users suffer, including--but not limited to--loss of data resulting from delays or interruptions in service. The District will not be responsible for the accuracy, nature, or quality of information stored on District diskettes, hard drives, or servers; nor for the accuracy, nature, or quality of information gathered through District-provided Internet access. The District will not be responsible for personal property used to access District computers or networks or for District-provided Internet access. The District will not be responsible for unauthorized financial obligations resulting from District-provided access to the Internet.
Parents of students in the {SCHOOL DISTRICT} shall be provided with the following information:
The {SCHOOL DISTRICT} is pleased to offer its students access to the Internet. The Internet is an electronic highway connecting hundreds of thousands of computers and millions of individual users all over the world. This computer technology will help propel our schools through the communication age by allowing students and staff to access and use resources from distant computers, communicate and collaborate with other individuals and groups around the world, and significantly expand their available information base. The Internet is a tool for life-long learning.
Families should be aware that some material accessible via the Internet may contain items that are illegal, defamatory, inaccurate, or potentially offensive to some people. In addition, it is possible to purchase certain goods and services via the Internet which could result in unwanted financial obligations for which a student's parent or guardian would be liable.
While the District's intent is to make Internet access available in order to further educational goals and objectives, students may find ways to access other materials as well. Even should the District institute technical methods or systems to regulate students' Internet access, those methods could not guarantee compliance with the District's acceptable use policy. That notwithstanding, the District believes that the benefits to students of access to the Internet exceed any disadvantages. Ultimately, however, parents and guardians of minors are responsible for setting and conveying the standards that their children should follow when using media and information sources. Toward that end, the {SCHOOL DISTRICT} makes the District's complete Internet policy and procedures available on request for review by all parents, guardians, and other members of the community; and provides parents and guardians the option of requesting for their minor children alternative activities not requiring Internet use.
NOTICE: This policy and all its provisions are subordinate to local, state, and federal statutes.
Contact: webmaster@doe.state.in.us
Updated: 12/27/2001 1:38 PM
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Comment:
Indiana AUP Model 

Title:
IDOE>OLR
Text:
STATE RECOMMENDATIONS
for
PUBLIC SCHOOL INTERNET ACCEPTABLE USE POLICIES and GUIDELINES
A. It is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED that each public school corporation in Indiana establish an Internet Acceptable Use Policy that is consistent with existing policies for print media, and that the local Internet Acceptable Use Policy include:
1. A brief explanation of the Internet, content that is available via the Internet, and the potential educational value of students access to the Internet.
2. Disclaimer limiting the school corporation's liability relative to:
a. Information stored on school corporation diskettes, hard drives or servers.
b. Information retrieved through school corporation computers, networks or on-line resources.
c. Personal property used to access school corporation computers, networks or on-line resources.
d. Unauthorized financial obligations resulting from use of school corporation resources/accounts to access the Internet.
3. Parent/guardian responsibilities.
4. A description of the privacy rights and limitations of school sponsored/managed Internet accounts.
5. Notification that, even though the school corporation may use technical means to limit student Internet access, these limits do not provide a foolproof means for enforcing the provisions of local acceptable use policies.
6. Notification that all provisions of the policy are subordinate to local, state and federal statute.
7. Notification to parents/guardians that it is possible for students to purchase goods and services via the Internet, and that these purchases could potentially result in unwantedfinancial obligations.
B. It is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED that each public school corporation in Indiana develop guidelines that:
1. Include suggestions to help parents and students to take full advantage of Internet access from home or public access terminals.
2. Require students of an appropriate age to read and sign (indicating their acceptance of the provisions and agreement to comply) the school corporation's Acceptable use Policy.
3. Describe appropriate staff use of school corporation Internet resources/accounts.
4. For internal use, assign specific staff with special security, management and account responsibilities associated with the school corporation's Internet resources and accounts.
5. Include procedure for users to subscribe to Internet service, such as listservers and news groups.
Contact: webmaster@doe.state.in.us
Updated: 12/27/2001 1:38 PM
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Comment:
Indians AUP Recommendations 

Title:
IDOE>OLR
Text:
STATE REQUIREMENTS for PUBLIC SCHOOL INTERNET
ACCEPTABLE USE POLICIES
and GUIDELINES
A. Each public school corporation in Indiana MUST adopt an Internet Acceptable Use Policy which:
1. Describes general instructional philosophies and strategies to be supported by Internet access in schools.
2. Describes the process for governing local Internet system security, user accounts and user privileges.
3. Describes sanctions to be taken when violations of the policy occur.
4. Makes specific reference to prohibiting the use of school corporation Internet resources/accounts:
a. To access, upload, download or distribute pornographic, obscene or sexually explicit material.
b. To transmit obscene, abusive or sexually explicit language.
c. To violate any local, state or federal statute.
d. To vandalize, damage or disable the property of another person or organization.
e. To access another person's materials, information or files without the implied or direct permission of that person.
f. To violate copyright, or otherwise use another person's intellectual property without their prior approval or proper citation.
5. Requires that parents be notified that their students will be using school corporation resources/accounts to access the Internet, and provides parents the option to request alternative activities not requiring Internet access.
6. Requires the permission of and supervision by the school's professional staff before a student may use a school account or resource to access the Internet.
7. Indicates that the educational value of student Internet access is the joint responsibility of students, parents and employees of the school corporation.
8. Makes the school corporation's Internet policies and procedures available for review by all parents, guardians, staff and members of the community.
B. Each public school corporation in Indiana MUST provide staff and student Internet users guidelines for:
1. Responding to unsolicited on-line contact.
2. Safe-guarding personal information, such as name, address, telephone number, etc.
Comment:
Indiana AUP requirements 

Title:
BELLINGHAM SCHOOL DISTRICT 501
Text:
This policy may be copied.
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BELLINGHAM SCHOOL DISTRICT 501
2313
BOARD POLICY
STUDENT ACCESS TO NETWORKED INFORMATION RESOURCES
The Board recognizes that as telecommunications and other new technologies shift the ways that information may be accessed, communicated and transferred by members of the society, those changes may also alter instruction and student learning. The Board generally supports access by students to rich information resources along with the development by staff of appropriate skills to analyze and evaluate such resources. In a free and democratic society, access to information is a fundamental right of citizenship.
Telecommunications, electronic information sources and networked services significantly alter the information landscape for schools by opening classrooms to a broader array of resources. In the past, instructional and library media materials could usually be screened--prior to use--by committees of educators and community members intent on subjecting all such materials to reasonable selection criteria. Board Policy 2311 requires that all such materials be consistent with district-adopted guides, supporting and enriching the curriculum while taking into account the varied instructional needs, learning styles, abilities and developmental levels of the students. Telecommunications, because they may lead to any publicly available fileserver in the world, will open classrooms to electronic information resources which have not been screened by educators for use by students of various ages.
Electronic information research skills are now fundamental to preparation of citizens and future employees during an Age of Information. The Board expects that staff will blend thoughtful use of such information throughout the curriculum and that the staff will provide guidance and instruction to students in the appropriate use of such resources. Staff will consult the guidelines for instructional materials contained in Board Policy 2311 and will honor the goals for selection of instructional materials contained therein.
Students are responsible for good behavior on school computer networks just as they are in a classroom or a school hallway. Communications on the network are often public in nature. General school rules for behavior and communications apply (see Board Policy 3200). The network is provided for students to conduct research and communicate with others. Access to network services will be provided to students who agree to act in a considerate and responsible manner.
Independent student use of telecommunications and electronic information resources will be permitted upon submission of permission forms and agreement forms by parents of minor students (under 18 years of age) and by students themselves. Regional networks such as WEDNET require agreement by users to acceptable use policies outlining standards for behavior and communication.
Access to telecommunications will enable students to explore thousands of libraries, databases, and bulletin boards while exchanging messages with people throughout the world. The Board believes that the benefits to students from access in the form of information resources and opportunities for collaboration, exceed the disadvantages. But ultimately, parents and guardians of minors are responsible for setting and conveying the standards that their children should follow when using media and information sources. To that end, the Bellingham Public Schools support and respect each family's right to decide whether or not to apply for independent access.
The Board authorizes the Superintendent to prepare appropriate procedures for implementing this policy and for reviewing and evaluating its effect on instruction and student achievement.
Adopted: April 27, 1995
Bellingham Public Schools, 1306 Dupont, Bellingham, WA 98225 (360) 676-6400
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Comment:
Bellingham 

Title:
Internet Policy Toolkit
Text:
The Internet Policy Toolkit
NHEMA/NHSTE
New Hampshire Educational Media Association New Hampshire affiliate of the International Society for Technology in Education
As more and more districts in New Hampshire have embraced Internet usage, it became apparent that many educators were performing repetitive policy formulation. To give everyone a common vantage point and to eliminate redundancy of effort, a committee convened to pool resources and outline the most essential facets of Internet policy design.
This Internet Policy Toolkit is provided to you as a member of NHEMA or NHSTE. The intent of the authoring committee was to present you a substantial resource for creating your own district policy. We hope we have included all the major points that need to be considered when formulating policy. We recommend you develop your policy based on your school population and needs.
The committee does not endorse any specific policy nor assume responsibility for uses of this document. Hot links to Acceptable Use Policies that are quoted below are located under Sources.
The Process
We encourage the establishment of a district level electronic information resources committee. Whenever possible, the committee should be composed of school board members, administrators, teachers, library media personnel, students, and parents. It should be chaired by the administrator who has overall responsibility for student use of the electronic information resources. The committee should develop policies and provide all users and potential users and parents with a handbook that describes the policies related to the acceptable use of electronic information resources.
"The primary purposes of the committee are to devise ways to protect students, to develop processes for the reporting of abuses, and to design methods to prevent their recurrence. All users should be aware that the inappropriate use of electronic information resources can be a violation of local, state, and federal laws. Violations can lead to prosecution. " California Department of Education
"The networking environment requires that school officials define guidelines for student exploration and use of electronic information resources. Such guidelines should address issues of privacy, ethical use of information with respect to intellectual property, using the networks for illegal activities, or knowingly spreading embedded messages or other programs or data. Internet use guidelines should have as their underlying value the preservation of student rights to examine and use all information formats and should not be used to place restrictions on student use of the Internet." Minnesota Public School Internet Policy.
Policy
Begin with a philosophy statement. Philosophy tells why YOU are offering Internet in your district. Include the idea that the Internet is something with which every educator and student needs to become comfortable in gathering information and data. Examples:
"Because the Internet is a fluid environment, the information which will be available to student is constantly changing; therefore, it is impossible to predict with certainty what information students might locate. Just as the purchase, availability, and use of media materials does not indicate endorsement of their contents by school officials, neither does making electronic information available to students imply endorsement of that content." Minnesota Public School Internet Policy
"The purpose of the Internet is to facilitate communications in support of research and education, by providing access to unique resources and an opportunity for collaborative work. To remain eligible as a user, the use of your account must be in support of and consistent with theeducational objectives of the district."Kings County, California
"We are very pleased to bring this access to our school and believe the Internet offers vast, diverse, and unique resources to the community. Our goal in providing this service to students is to promote educational excellence at ______ by facilitating communications for resource sharing and innovation." Taylor Road Middle School in Georgia
"The Internet is a privilege, increasingly essential to learning that offers new freedoms and demands new responsibilities. Guidelines for use are practical and logical extensions of our community's commitment to conduct that is legal, responsible, ethical, and considerate (thoughtfully respectful of others.)" St. Paul's School - Concord, NH
Include a background explanation of what you are attempting to do. Specify to what students and teachers have access. Describe the advantages and dangers of going ahead with this.
Statement of Policy
An example:
"It is the policy of the _________ School Board to maintain an environment that promotes ethical and responsible conduct in all online network activities by staff and students. It shall be a violation of this policy for any employee or student to engage in any activity that does not conform to the established purpose and general rules and policies of the network." East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana
User Rights
Include a statement that describes freedom and equality of access to the Net.
Example:
"All network users will be granted free and equal access to as many network services as their technology allows. Exploration of the Internet is encouraged within the bounds of _______ mission statement. SERESCNET, (Rights and Privileges)
"The use of _____ network is a privilege, not a right, and inappropriate use will result in cancellation of that privilege." SERESCNET, (Rights and Privileges)
User Responsibilities
Including the following: User knowledge of the whole system ... User understanding of the fundamentals of operation within the system ... User Protection ...
Example:
"Students are not to reveal their personal home address, home phone number, or phone numbers of any other individuals. Your personal signature on any e-mail must use the school address only. You must notify your parent(s)/guardian(s) and system administrator immediately if any individual is trying to contact you for illicit or suspicious activities." Boulder Valley School District.
Respect Privacy
"Learn proper codes of conduct in electronic communication. In news groups, giving out personal information is inappropriate. When using e-mail extreme caution must always be taken in revealing any information of a personal nature. Giving out personal information about another person, including home address or phone number, is strictly prohibited." East Baton Rouge Parish Schoolnet
Usage guidelines
The following are examples of usage guidelines from various sources.
Based on Northfield Public Schools, Michigan
Acceptable/Unacceptable Use
All use of the Internet must be in support of education and research and consistent with the purposes of _________________ School District;
Any use of the network for commercial or for-profit purposes is prohibited;
Extensive use of the network for personal and private business is prohibited;
Any use of the network for product advertisement or political lobbying is prohibited;
Network accounts are to be used only by the authorized owner of the account for the authorized purpose;
Users shall not intentionally seek information on, obtain copies of, or modify files, other data, or passwords belonging to other users, or misrepresent other users on the network;
All communications and information accessible via the network should be assumed to be private property;
No use of the network shall serve to disrupt the use of the network by others; hardware or software shall not be destroyed, modified, or abused in any way;
Malicious use of the network to develop programs that harass other users or infiltrate a computer or computing system and/or damage the software components of a computer or computing system is prohibited;
Hate mail, harassment, discriminatory remarks and other antisocial behaviors are prohibited on the network;
The illegal installation of copyrighted software for use on district computers is prohibited;
Use of the network to access or process pornographic material, inappropriate text files, or files dangerous to the integrity of the local area network is prohibited;
Subscriptions to listservs must be reported to the building system operator (SYSOP). Get the name of the SYSOP in the principal's office. Prior approval for listservs is required for students;
Mail listservs must be monitored daily and deleted from the personal mail directory to avoid excessive use of fileserver hard-disk space;
From time to time ____________ School District will make determinations on whether specific uses of the network are consistent with the acceptable use practice.
SERESCNET Acceptable Use Policy
Specifically Acceptable Uses
Contact with researchers, educators, students and databases in connection with research, instruction, or exploration of the Internet's resources;
Communication and exchange for professional development, to maintain currency or to debate issues in a field or subfield of knowledge;
Use in applying for or administrating grants or contracts for research or instruction, but not for other fund-raising or public relations activities;
Any other administrative communications or activities which support and further _____________'s goals and objectives;
Announcements of discoveries or products for use in research or instruction, but not advertising or any kind;
Communication incidental to otherwise acceptable use, except for illegal or specifically unacceptable use.
Specifically unacceptable uses:
Use for for-profit activities;
Use for illegal activities;
Use which interferes with or disrupts network users, services, or equipment, including "chain letters" or "broadcast" messages to multiple lists or individuals.
East Baton Rouge Parish SchoolNet
Acceptable Uses
Using the account by the authorized owner for the authorized purpose;
Using the equipment and system in a manner that respects the rights of others;
Downloading and uploading educational freeware and/or shareware;
Adhering to quotas for disk space on the system;
Deleting messages according to system guidelines;
Subscribing only to authorized listservs;
Using established expectations and practices a. Be polite - Never forget that the person on the other side is human; b. Be brief; c. Use appropriate language.
Exhibiting exemplary behavior on the network as a representative of your school and community.
Unacceptable Uses
Revealing your user ID and password to others or gaining access to another person's ID and/or password;
Using profanity, obscenity, or other language which may be offensive to another user;
Reposting personal communications without the author's prior consent;
Downloading and uploading pirated or illegal software in violation of copyright law or discussions of such items;
Using the network for financial gain or for any commercial or illegal activity;
Using the network for personal and [or] private business; or political lobbying;
Uploading or creating computer viruses, which is considered a criminal offense
Destroying or modifying data or committing any form of vandalism;
Developing programs that harass other users or infiltrate a computer or computing system and/or damage the software components of a computer or computing device;
Sending hate mail or chain letters, harassment, discriminatory remarks and other antisocial behaviors;
Accessing or processing pornographic material, inappropriate text files, or files dangerous to the integrity of the local area network;
Using fake names or pseudonyms;
Playing games or using Internet relay- chat is prohibited unless authorized by a teacher for classroom purposes;
Using school equipment to dial into other networks or bulletin board systems (BBS), local or remote, that have not been approved by the teacher;
Transmitting any material in violation of state or federal law.
Code of conduct - "netiquette" The use of an account on ________net requires that you abide by accepted rules of network etiquette. These include, but are not limited to, the following:
BE POLITE. Do not send abusive messages to ANYONE.
USE APPROPRIATE LANGUAGE. In all messages, do not swear, use vulgarities or any other inappropriate language. Anything pertaining to illegal activities is strictly forbidden.
RESPECT PRIVACY. Learn proper codes of conduct in electronic communication. In news groups, giving out personal information is inappropriate. When using e-mail extreme caution must always be taken in revealing any information of a personal nature. Giving out personal information about another person, including home address or phone number, is strictly prohibited.
RESPECT ACCESS RIGHTS OF OTHERS. Do not use the network in a way that disrupts the use of the network by others. Abide by the time limits set by your school. Adhere to disk space allotment set by your system administrator(s).
Community High School Internet Policy Statement
The Internet account holder is held responsible for his/her actions and activity within his/her account. Unacceptable uses of the network will result in the suspension or revoking of these privileges. Some examples of such unacceptable use are:
Using the network for any illegal activity, including violation of copyright or other contracts;
Using the network for financial or commercial gain;
Degrading or disrupting equipment, software or system performance;
Vandalizing the data of another user;
Wastefully using finite resources;
Gaining unauthorized access to resources or entities;
Invading the privacy of individuals;
Using an account owned by another user;
Posting personal communications without the original author's consent;
Posting anonymous messages;
Downloading, storing or printing files or messages that are profane, obscene, or that use language that offends or tends to degrade others;
Violating the Content Guidelines as outlined below.
Content/Publishing Guidelines Students will be allowed to produce materials for electronic publication on the Internet. Network administrators will monitor these materials to ensure compliance with content standards. The content of student materials is constrained by the following restrictions:
No personal information about a student will be allowed. This includes home telephone numbers and addresses as well as information regarding the specific location of any student at any given time;
All student work must be signed with the student's full name;
Individuals in pictures, movies, or sound recordings may be identified only by initials (e.g. JQP for John Q. Public). Absolutely no first or last names may appear in reference to individuals in any image, movie, or sound recording;
No text, image, movie, or sound recording that contains pornography, profanity, obscenity, or language that offends or tends to degrade others will be allowed.
You may also want to include a statement about any form of purchase over the Internet.
Liability
Commercial use may or may not be available to users - user incurs charges.
"The district cannot be held accountable for the information that is retrieved via the network...." Developing a School or District "Acceptable Use Policy" for Student and Staff Access to the Internet, Page 6, Clancy J. Wolf.
Pursuant to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (18 USC 2510 et seq), notice is hereby given that there are NO facilities provided by this system for sending or receiving private or confidential electronic communications. System administrators have access to all mail and will monitor messages. Messages relating to or in support of illegal activities will be reported to the appropriate authorities.
The East Baton Rouge Parish School System reserves the right to log network use and to monitor fileserver space utilization by users and assumes no responsibility or liability for files deleted due to violation of fileserver space allotments.
The East Baton Rouge School System reserves the right to remove a user account on the network.
East Baton Rouge Parish SchoolNet assumes no responsibility or liability for any phone charges including but not limited to, long distance charges, per minute surcharges and/or equipment or line costs, you may incur while accessing SchoolNet.
East Baton Rouge Parish SchoolNet will not be responsible for any damages you may suffer. This includes the loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, or service interruptions caused by our own negligence or your errors or omissions. Use of any information obtained is at your own risk. Any computer connected to a network should have anti-virus software installed. SchoolNet specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its services. School Net makes no warranties, either expressed or implied, with regard to software obtained from this system.
East Baton Rouge Parish SchoolNet reserves the right to change its policies and rules at any time. East Baton Rouge SchoolNet
"___________ net makes no warranties (expressed or implied) with respect to ____________net service, and it specifically assumes no responsibilities for:
The content of any advice or information received by a user outside _______________net, or any costs or charges incurred as a result of seeing or accepting such advice;
Any costs, liability or damages caused by the way the user chooses to use his/her ___________net access;
Any consequences of service interruptions or changes, even if these disruptions arise from circumstances under the control of _________net. ___________net is provided on an 'as is, as available' basis." SERESCNET Acceptable Use Policy
"The content of any advice or information received by an account holder from a source outside Nueva, or any costs or charges incurred as a result of seeing or accepting such advice; Any costs, liability or damages caused by the way the account holder chooses to use his/her Nueva access; Any consequences of service interruptions or changes, even if these disruptions arise from circumstances under the control of Nueva; While NuevaNet supports the privacy of electronic mail, account users must assume that this cannot be guaranteed . NuevaNet, California Acceptable Use Policy and Contract
Other Considerations ...
As the policy is developed, the following areas may need to be addressed: (1) Administration and enforcement of the school policy/guidelines; (2) Administration of accounts; and (3) Consequences of improper use. Examples follow...
"Any user who does not comply with Policies and Guidelines will lost network privileges for a period of not less than one week. Repeated or severe infractions of the Policies and Guidelines may result in termination of access privileges permanently. Student infractions may result in appropriate disciplinary action in addition to suspension or termination of access privileges. Unauthorized use of the network, intentional deletion or damage to files and data belonging to other users, or copyright violations may be termed theft as defined under DOE Chapter 19, and/or the Hawaii Revised Statutes.
Developing a School or District 'Acceptable Use Policy' for Student and Staff Access to the Internet. Page 13, Consequences of Inappropriate Network Behavior." Waiakea Intermediate School, Hilo, Hawaii. FROM: Clancy Wolf
"The NuevaNet account holder is held responsible for his/her actions and activity within his/her account. Unacceptable uses of the network will result in the suspension or revoking of these privileges." NuevaNet, California
"The use of Internet is a privilege, not a right. Inappropriate use, including any violation of these conditions and rules, may result in cancellation of the privilege. The Kings County Office of Education, under this agreement, is delegated the authority to determine appropriate use and may deny, evoke, suspend or close any user account at any time based upon its determination of inappropriate use by account holder or user." King County Schools, California.
Account Application Forms
Should include a statement that the student/parent assumes responsibility/liability for all purchases over the Internet. The example below is from Virginia's Public Education Network.
SPONSORING TEACHER(S) (Required):
I agree to sponsor the above student and to supervise his/her responsible use of the network as defined by the Acceptable Use Policy and Student Guidelines while in my classes.
Teachers' Signature(s)_____________________________Date(s)_________
_____________________________________________________________
SPONSORING PARENT or GUARDIAN (Required)
I have read the Acceptable Use Policy and Student Guidelines for VIRGINIA'S PEN. I understand that although administrators of the VIRGINIA'S PEN network have taken reasonable precautions to ensure that controversial material is eliminated on Virqinia's Public Education Network, I will monitor my child's daily use of the VIRGINIA'S PEN and his/her potential access to the world-wide Internet, and will accept full responsibility for supervision in that regard if and when my child's use is not in a school setting. I hereby give my permission to issue an account for my child and certify that the information contained on this form is correct.
Parent's Signature_____________________________Date__________
Home Address________________________________Home Phone_________
*Student application must be renewed each academic year.
Approval by Virginia Dept. of Education representative:
Name_____________________Title__________________ Date__________
Security issues
Users should know who to report to if there is a breach of security.
5. Security - Security on any computer system is a high priority, especially when the system involves many users. If you feel you can identify a security problem on the Internet, you must notify a system administrator or your District Internet Coordinator. Do not demonstrate the problem to other users. Do not use another individual's account without written permission from that individual. Attempts to logon to the Internet as a system administrator will result in cancellation of user privileges. Any user identified as a security risk or having a history of problems with other computer systems may be denied access to Internet. Developing a School or District "Acceptable Use Policy" for Student and Staff Access to the Internet. Clancy J. Wolf
V. SECURITY: Security on any computer system is a high priority, especially when the system- involves many users. The following security items are applicable to everyone.
1. If you can identify a security problem you must notify a system administrator. Do not demonstrate the problem to other users.
2. Do not use another individual's account.
3. Attempts to log in to the system as any other user will result in cancellation of your user privileges
4. Any user identified as a security risk or having a history of problems with other computer systems may be denied access to EBR SchoolNet East Baton Rouge SchoolNet
"Security on any computer system is a high priority, especially when the system involves many users. If you fell you can identify a security problem on the Internet, you must notify the system administrator. Do not demonstrate the problem to other users. Do not use another individual's account. DO NOT REVEAL YOUR PASSWORD TO ANYONE. Attempts to log in to the Internet as a system administrator will result in immediate cancellation of user privileges. Any user identified as a security risk or having a history of problems with other computer systems may be denied access to the Internet." Taylor Middle School, Atlanta, Georgia.
Any policy or collection of guidelines should be brought to a lawyer to ensure it is legally binding for users.
"Exemplary School District" Internet Use Agreement
I understand and will abide by the above Internet Use Agreement. I further understand that any violation of the regulations above is unethical and may constitute a criminal offense. Should I commit any violation, my access privileges may be revoked, school disciplinary action may be taken, and/or appropriate legal action.
User Signature:____________________________ Date:__________
PARENT OR GUARDIAN (If you are under the age of 18 a parent or guardian must also read and sign this agreement.)
As the parent or guardian of this student, I have read the Internet Use Agreement. I understand that this access is designed for educational purposes. Exemplary School District has taken precautions to eliminate controversial material. However, I also recognize it is impossible for Exemplary School District to restrict access to all controversial materials and I will not hold them responsible for materials acquired on the network. Further, I accept full responsibility for supervision if and when my child's use is not in a school setting. I hereby give permission to issue an account for my child and certify that the information contained on this form is correct.
Parent or Guardian's Name (please print):
Signature:_______________________________ Date:_____________
SPONSORING TEACHER (Must be signed if the applicant is a student) :
Teacher's Name (please print):_________________________________
Signature:_______________________________ Date:_____________
I have read the Internet Use Agreement and agree to promote this agreement with the student. Because the student may use the network for individual work or in the context of another class, I cannot be held responsible for the student use of the network. As the sponsoring teacher I do agree to instruct the student on acceptable use of the network and proper network etiquette. Developing a School or District "Acceptable Use Policy" for Student and Staff Access to the Internet. Clancy J. Wolf
APPENDIX A
Information from Bellingham School District 501, Bellingham, Washington may also be useful.
Board Policy: Student Access to Networked Information Resources
Administrative Procedures: Student Access to Networked Information Resources
APPENDIX B
Sources
General Sources for Accepable Use Policies
CoVis Network Use Policies
Armadillo's WWW Server Acceptable Use Policies and More from Rice University
Specific Acceptable Use Policies and Information Cited
Boulder Valley School District, CO
California Department of Education
Community High School, Ann Arbor, MI
East Baton Rouge Parish School District, East Baton Rouge, LA
Kings Couty, CA
Minnesota Coalition Against Censorship
1021 West Broadway, Minneapolis, MN 55411
Minnesota Public Schools
Northfield Public Schools (see Clancy J. Wolf)
NuevaNET, CA
SERESCnet, Derry, NH
St. Paul's School, Concord, NH
Taylor Road Middle School, GA
Virginia's PEN
Waiakea Intermediate School, Hilo, HI (see Clancy J. Wolf)
Wolf, Clancy J. Developing a School or District "Acceptable Use Policy" for Student and Staff Access to the Internet Olympic Educational Service District 114, Bremerton, WA, February, 1994.
Information at this site, which comes from a variety of sources, is not necessarily official NHSTE information. Official statements of NHSTE will be noted.
© NHSTE 1999
This page last updated Friday, May 05, 2000, by Chuck Mitchell, NHSTE Publicity Chair, email: chuck@chts.com
These pages are provided by:
Comment:
New Ham DOE AUP guidelines 

Title:
Internet. Acceptable Use Policies
Text:
Internet Acceptable Use Policies. K12.
Developed by Odile Heisel.
The following are WWW sites with information for educators who are writing district acceptable use policies. Links updated 9/19/00.
For Virginia's Schools, see:
Virginia State Dept. of Education Electronic Acceptable Use Handbook
Acceptable Use Policies. Armadillo; Dallas, TX
Acceptable Use Policies
Collection of policies; By Christine Collins, WEB 66
Acceptable Use Policy and Web Page Policy. Winona Middle School, Winona, MN
Avoiding Ethical Use Potholes; Acceptable Use Policies
By Salley Laughon
Bellingham School District 501 Board Policy.
Critique of Access Policies; Annotated References. From Electronic Frontier Foundation.
Internet Policy Toolkit
From New Hampshire Education Media Association
Internet Ethics Unit of Instruction for Grossmont Union High School Students. Grossmont, CA
K-12 Acceptable Use Policies. Willard, Nancy. Internet Marketing Services. Eugene, OR
Network Acceptable Use Policies. New Horizons Governor's School for Science and Technology
NuevaNet Acceptable Use Policy and Contract. Hillsborough, CA
Acceptable Use Policy. Indiana Public Schools
Guidelines from the Indiana DOE
Comment:
college student collection of APUs. 

Title:
Acceptable Internet Use Policies - A Handbook, Virginia Department of Education
Text:
ACCEPTABLE USE POLICIES - A HANDBOOK
Virginia Department of Education
Division of Technology
[ Introduction | Components | Samples |
Forms and Templates | Filtering & Safety ]
Send additions or comments to:
aup@pen.k12.va.us
Return to VDOE homepage
INTRODUCTION
Many Virginia K-12 educators use the instructional resources found via shared educational tools, such as school and division-wide computer networks and the Internet. The increased use of such resources requires that administrators, teachers, library media specialists, students, and parents take steps to ensure that when used responsibly, these tools and the resources found by them are appropriate for use in K-12 instruction.
In response to these concerns, schools or school divisions are required to establish guidelines for the appropriate use of computer networks. Such guidelines are generally called an Acceptable Internet Use Policy, or AUP. By definition, an AUP is a written agreement in the form of guidelines, signed by students, their parents and their teachers, outlining the terms and conditions of Internet use-rules of online behavior and access privileges.
To assist school divisions, we have created an electronic "handbook" of resources. Since schools are at various stages of implementation in the use of computer networks, this electronic handbook does not prescribe a single Acceptable Internet Use Policy. Instead, it provides links to various sources of information that may be helpful to administrators, teachers, library media specialists, and parents in the development of a local AUP. The Internet is a virtual community based simply on courtesy and commonsense. A local AUP reflects the circumstances unique to the school or division, the electronic system used, and clearly defines what constitutes local responsible use of information networks.
The handbook provides links to sites that contain information on The Components of an AUP, Sample School/Division AUPs, Samples and Templates for an AUP, and Resources.
Every effort has been made to validate each URL referenced. However, information on the Internet does appear, disappear, and change over time. Should you determine that an address for a particular link has changed, please send a message to us.
The links to sites are not exhaustive, but serve as representative of the many sources of information for local educators. If you have comments or suggestions, please contact Lan Neugent.
External sites are not endorsed by the Virginia Department of Education.
COMPONENTS
A well-written Acceptable Use Policy focuses on responsible use of computer networks, including the Internet, and access and transmitting of information to K-12 classrooms and the library media center. Most Acceptable Use Policies include the following components:
-a description of the instructional philosophies and strategies to be supported by Internet access in schools
-a statement on the educational uses and advantages of the Internet in your school or division
-a list of the responsibilities of educators, parents, and students for using the Internet
-a code of conduct governing behavior on the Internet
-a description of the consequences of violating the AUP
-a description of what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable use of the Internet
-a disclaimer absolving the school division, under specific circumstances, from responsibility
-a statement reminding users that Internet access and the use of computer networks is a privilege
-a statement that the AUP is in compliance with state and national telecommunication rules and regulations
-a signature form for teachers, parents, and students indicating their intent to abide by the AUP
Click on the following links to see examples of the various components of an AUP.
Internet Advocate
Librarian’s Information Online Network: Internet Forum
Public School Internet AUP
Safekids
Teen safety on the Information Highway
Internet Learning Partners
Rice University
Netizen
Acceptable Use Policies
Library Policy Development for Internet Access in the School Environment
Development of Student Acceptable Use Policies-From the National Education Association
A Legal and Educational Analysis
Armadillo's WWW Server
SEIRTEC/SREB Appropriate Use Policies
SAMPLE AUPS
In preparing your AUP, it is helpful to review AUPs from other schools or divisions. They can be used as a template for creating your own AUP. Be certain to modify them as necessary to fit your particular need.
Click on the following links to see AUP's from both Virginia schools, schools throughout the nation, and professional organizations.
Policies in Virginia
All school divisions are required to have an Acceptable Use Policy. Many school divisions have their policies posted on their Web sites. This site contains links to each school division that has a Web page open to the public: http://www.pen.k12.va.us/Div/#Schl
Policies from other states
New Mexico Council of Technology Education: Internet Use Policies
Armadillo’s WWW Server
Needham Public Schools-Student Contract
Caroline County, Maryland
TEMPLATES
A signature form for teachers, parents, and students indicates their intent to abide by the AUP. Such forms are vital to the successful implementation of your AUP. Click on the following links to see examples of signature, consent, or release forms and agreements.
Monroe County Missouri Public Schools
Owen J. Roberts School District
Mankato Area Public Schools
INTERNET SAFETY AND FILTERING ISSUES
The following are links to information regarding Internet safety and filtering. Click on the links below to see some of the many options that are currently available. Links to both the federal and state legislation are included.
Safe Kids
Child Safety on the Information Highway
By Lawrence J. Magid
(c) 1998 National Center for Missing and
Exploited Children
The Internet and Public Libraries.... Issues and Opportunities (This information is not just for public libraries. There is information about filtering and Internet safety that is applicable for any school library.
FilteringInfo.ORG
Safeguarding the Wired Schoolhouse
The Consortium for School Networking
N2H2
Virginia General Assembly Internet Filtering Law for Virginia Public and Private Schools
Virginia schools are required to implement filtering in public schools by July 1, 2001 according to newly enacted state law.
Link to amended law:
Federal Internet Filtering Law and Regulations for E-Rate Recipients
The Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) requires schools and libraries receiving E-Rate discounts for Internet access and internal connections to comply with the Act.
On April 5, 2001 the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued regulations for schools and libraries receiving non-telecommunications E-Rate discounts.
For information regarding filtering software, the following table may provide guidance:
MethodDescriptionSoftware
Proxy Server AUP Action Tools, FAIR, BESS,I-Gear, Smart Filter, WebSense
Blocking, with limited accessBlocking is from a list, or my parent/educators specified listCyberPatrol
Blocking, Stealth MonitoringBlocks access for a list, parents can not add or change items on listCyberSittter2000, Disk Tracy, Internet Filter Suite
Blocking with controlled accessBlocks from a list, parents can monitorSearchlight, Hexabit Junior, Gulliver' , SOS Kid Proof,
Stealth MonitoringMonitors activities using a contextual text recognition systemCyberSentinel, SentryCam, Smart Alex ICU, Spector, WinGuardian, WinWhatWhere,
Controlled accessDegree of control can be monitored for each userEdmin, KidDesk Internet Safe, Mama Bear, WebWhacker
Hardware deviceBlocks Internet access without disabling the computerNet Protector
BlockingBlocks objectionable sites, can be customizedNetNanny SurfWatch, X-Stop
Blocking, monitoringUser defined boundariesOmniQuad, SafeNet
Blocking and rating systemA rating system that can be customized by the individuals and has a listing of ratings based on information about the web that is provided to a companySafe Surf
VDOE Home
Comment:
VA DOE 

Title:
Consortium for School Networking -- www.cosn.org
Text:
The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), a national nonprofit organization, promotes the use of information technologies and the Internet in K-12 education to improve learning. Our members represent school districts, state and local education agencies, nonprofits, companies and individuals who share our vision.
CoSN's new membership year starts July 1st. If you have not renewed, do it today so you don't miss any of the great CoSN benefits!
What's New
[08.04.02] Wireless Technology: Understanding Your Options
Designed for chief technology decision makers at the school district level, this interactive professional development session will examine the latest developments in the exploding area of wireless networking and integrated communications...
[07.19.02] Missed the July 1 Deadine to Renew Your Membership?
Hurry, you still have time. Renew by August 1 to keep your access to all of CoSN's great information coming regularly, directly to your mailbox. And remember, when you get a new member to join CoSN, you'll also get a discount!
[07.18.02] BellSouth Foundation Awards $50,000 to CoSN
The BellSouth Foundation announced today that CoSN will receive a $50,000 grant to help develop and disseminate a toolkit for schools entitled, "Talking to Your Parents and Community About Internet Safety..."
[07.18.02] Call for Presenters for the 2003 K12 School Networking Conference
The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) will be holding it's 8th Annual K-12 School Networking Conference: Achievement, Assessment & Accountability on February 26 & 27, 2003 at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, VA. CoSN is soliciting presenters for this important national conference on how the Internet and information technologies infrastructure can improve learning and student achievement in the K-12 classroom...
[07.18.02] New Corporate Membership and Sponsorship Opportunities Brochure is now Available
CoSN has developed a new Corporate Sponsorship Package Program to present companies with exciting ways to reach CoSN's members, conference attendees and users of CoSN's leadership initiatives, plus provide value added benefits...
[07.18.02] K-12 School Networking Conference Sponsor, Exhibitor and Promotional Opportunities Prospectus Now Available
If your organization is looking for one venue to meet prospective clients, gain access to over 500 key decision-makers from school districts, state education networks, department of education and the federal government and obtain more visibility, let us recommend exhibiting or sponsoring at the K-12 School Networking Conference...
[07.17.02] CoSN Comments on Proposed EPA Rule on Computer Disposal
The Consortium for School Networking has filed comments with the Environmental Protection Agency on a proposed rule addressing the disposal of used cathode ray tubes, which are considered a federally regulated hazardous waste.
CoSN's comments can be reviewed at www.cosn.org/resources/071702b.htm.
[07.10.02] Technology Briefs for State and Local No Child Left Behind Planners
State and local technology planners who intend to apply for funding through the "Enhancing Education with Technology Program," established by the 2002 No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, now have an important free tool to help with their applications...
[07.09.02] CoSN Membership Telethon: Thanks to SpectraLink
CoSN thanks SpectraLink, a wireless solution for schools, for their generous support at the kickoff this years 2002-2003 membership campaign which was held at the National Education Computing Conference (NECC) in San Antonio. SpectraLink (www.spectralink.com) provided a wireless telephone system.
[07.08.02] E-Rate Reply Comments Synopses
CoSN has developed a synopses of the approximately 30 sets of Reply Comments filed in the FCC's E-Rate proceeding. For the most part, these comments reiterate positions taken in the initial round of comments, but some merit attention...
[06.20.02] NEW CoSN series of Internet & Education Web Telecasts announced starting fall 2002
The Internet & Education Web Telecast are 60 minute interactive presentations conducted over the Internet combined with an audio conference call discussing key issues. The new professional development series will be held six times over the coming year. The first event will be held September 18 (12-1pm ET) on Internet Safety: An Update on the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) and Schools.
Essentials from CoSN
Mark your calendars now for the 8th Annual 2003 K-12 School Networking Conference
Achievement, Assessment & Accountability
February 25-27, 2003
and
International Symposium
February 28, 2003.
Taking TCO to the Classroom, a great vendor-neutral resource for schools on budgeting for technology.
Safeguarding the Wired Schoolhouse, designed to help school leaders understand the issues involved in managing Internet content. It builds on the extensive work that the school community has already done to create positive online experiences for children.
CoSN CTO Council, a forum for district-level technology directors to discuss issues important to them, share information with their peers and keep up-to-date on best practices and solutions to issues facing the education technology arena.
Register for the CTO Council Listserv now!
TechLearning
New! TechLearning, a joint FREE e-publication from CoSN and TechLearning. Sign up today!
Email:
See Sample Issue No.1
Corporate Members
Institutional Members
Technology Standards for School Administrators
Technology Standards for School Administrators (TSSA) are in development and available for review and comment. Learn more on the TSSA Web Site. CoSN is a member of the TSSA Collaborative.
Online Privacy, Content Rating & Accessibility Policies
Home | About Us | Information Resources | Major Initiatives
Events | Join & Sponsor | Members | Contact Us
Comment:
CoSN Consortium for School Networking 

Title:
Internet filtering legislation information
Text:
Important Information For Teachers, Librarians, Administrators, and Tech Coordinators
UPDATE June 28, 2002: In response to the court ruling in ALA vs. U.S., the FCC has issued a ruling suspending enforcement of the requirement that public libraries purchase filtering software, pending review by the U.S. Supreme Court. The other portions of CIPA remain in effect for libraries, and all portions of CIPA remain in effect for schools. Click here for the full text of the FCC ruling.
Complete text of FCC ruling (Word, 169 KB / 39 Pages)
Congress recently passed HR 4577, which includes a series of new requirements for K-12 schools and public libraries that receive certain types of federal funding and provide Internet access. The requirements include:
The use of a technology protection measure that blocks or filters Internet access.
Adoption of an Internet Safety Policy,
Convening, in some cases, at least one public meeting to prepare the Internet safety policy.
This site, featuring step-by-step guides on compliance, resources for compliance and up-to-date information on the latest developments from pertinent federal agencies, is a public service provided by N2H2, Inc., the leading supplier of Internet filtering software to K-12 schools. We hope you find FilteringInfo.org a valuable resource in helping you to understand and comply with the new requirements for K-12 schools and public libraries.
About Filtering
Quick overview of Internet Filtering, how it works, and what you should look for in choosing a solution that's right for your school or library.
Compliance
Follow an easy, step-by-step guide to determine what requirements apply to your school or library, and learn how to take full advantage of available federal funding.
Resources
Find useful tools for developing an Internet safety policy, for conducting public meetings, and other resources.
Funding
Link to other E-rate, Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title III, and Library Services and Technology Act funding resources. Coming soon: step-by-step guide for E-rate compliance.
Stay Informed
Sign up to be notified of updates, or to request that a filtering specialist from N2H2 contact you.
Children's Internet Protection Act (PDF, 35 KB / 20 Pages)
This downloadable document contains the section of HR 4577 which pertains to filtering requirements for K-12 schools and libraries that receive certain types of federal funding and provide Internet access.
(Requires Adobe® Acrobat® Reader.)
HR 4577 — Consolidated Appropriations Act for FY2001
The complete text of HR 4577.
Complete text of FCC ruling (Word, 169 KB / 39 Pages)
www.filteringinfo.org is brought to you by
©2002 N2H2, Incorporated.
N2H2, Inc. and the N2H2 logo are trademarks of N2H2, Inc. All rights reserved.
For more information about N2H2, please call 800-971-2622.
Comment:
2002 N2H2 Advocacy Group - reviews federal requiremenets for federal safegards for school internet use. 

Title:
Acceptible Use Policies
Text:
Acceptable Use Policies
Appropriate use of the Internet by teachers and students is a concern of many educators. In conjunction with a technology plan, school and district planners frequently develop an acceptable use policy (AUP), which addresses how students, staff, and community members use the Internet. There are many web and gopher sites that list examples of acceptable use policies. Here are a few selected acceptable use policies, articles, publications, and online links.
Sample Acceptable Use Policies from
Northwest Schools
Bellingham Public Schools offers students access to the district computer network for both electronic mail and the Internet to enable them to explore thousands of libraries, databases, and bulletin boards while exchanging messages with Internet users throughout the world. To gain access to e-mail and the Internet, all students need a signed Internet and Electronic Permission Form. This site contains both the District rules for Internet and e-mail and a copy of the permission form.
[http://www.bham.wednet.edu/permiss2.htm]
The Eugene (OR) Public School District has developed a comprehensive site with guidelines for appropriate use, user application forms, student safety resources and technology resources at the district. Included amongst these resources is a pamphlet on keeping kids safe while they surf the Internet, Child Safety on the Information Highway.
[http://www.4j.lane.edu/4jnet/]
Links to Online Resources
Creating Board Policies for Student Use of the Internet. AUPs help to define acceptable behaviors by student and staff users of information systems, while Board policies take the matter much further tying those standards to the district's policies on student rights and responsibilities and a student's rights to privacy of freedom of speech. This article first appeared in From Now On, The Educational Technology Journal (vol.5, no. 7, May 1995).
[http://www.fromnowon.org/fnomay95.html]
The K-12 Acceptable Use Policies site contains a extensive selection of materials to assist school districts in the development of effective Internet policies and practices. Resources includes: a legal and educational analysis of K-12 acceptable use policies, and templates for a school board policy, acceptable student use, student account agreements, school employee account agreements, guest account agreements, and a letter to parents.
[http://www.erehwon.com/k12aup/]
NWREL's Northwest Educational Technology Consortium
Technology Plans: Resources Online ~ http://www.netc.org/tech_plans/
Last Updated: July 16, 1998
Comment:
NETC Guide for school AUP (Northwest Education Technology Consortium) 

Title:
Educational Technology Cooperative SEIR*TEC
Text:
Appropriate Use Policies (AUP)
States throughout the region are making AUP samples available to their schools and expect all schools and districts to implement appropriate use policies. However, no state has implemented a statewide appropriate use policy. Schools and districts should have in place policies to explain how the network and online communication is to be used for education, and communicate these policies to students, parents, and staff. Most require some kind of parental permission in order for children to be allowed to use the Internet. Appropriate Use Policies often govern e-mail use, web page publishing or use, and address security concerns.
It is also useful to incorporate appropriate or appropriate use into the school's code of discipline so that it is made clear to students and families that the school network and Internet access are important resources that should be wisely used. Having a clear, well written policy in place can go a long way in ensuring parental support for Internet use, as well as their support for disciplinary measures when necessary. Schools or districts should reevaluate their appropriate use policies annually, perhaps at the beginning of each school year, to ensure it continues to meet their needs relative to changing technology and school goals.
Universities also have policies in place that govern general use of campus computers and networks, not just Internet access. These policies generally state that the network is to be used only for academic or research purposes that support the mission and purpose of the institution.
A sampling of sites from across the SEIR*TEC region is included; many of these sites will also link to other resources and AUP sites. There are as many different AUPs as there are schools in the United States.
The Kentucky Department of Education provides acceptable use policy guidelines and state requirements for schools and district policies to support implementation of 1998 Senate Bill 230.
The Virginia Department of Education Division of Technology has an extensive handbook online. This handbook describes necessary components, samples of other AUPs, links that help answer some of the most common questions about AUPs, and templates that schools can use to write their own appropriate use policy. This resource offers access to many other schools and districts' appropriate use policies across the nation.
State employees who have access to electronic resources are also governed by appropriate use policies. In South Carolina, these policies include e-mail guidelines, web page publishing guidelines, appropriate Internet use, and security concerns. Also, states such as Texas, which provides a network available to all schools, often have implemented appropriate use policies for users of the network.
For further information, please contact Bill Thomas, bill.thomas@sreb.org
Copyright © by the Southern Regional Education Board. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions
Comment:
SREB AUP guide (Southeastern Regional Education Board) 

Title:
Center for Electronic Studying
Text:
Center for
Electronic Studying
CES is a research and development group in the University of Oregon College of Education investigating innovative applications of technology for middle school, secondary, and post-secondary students, their teachers and their schools.
Comment:
UOrigon Center for Electronic Studying. 

Title:
InTime: Wirelessly-Networked Notetaking
Text:
InTime: Wirelessly Networked Notetaking
Support for Migrant/ELLStudents
in General High School Classes
Carolyn Harper Knox, Ph.D.
Center for Advanced Technology in Education
College of Education, University of Oregon
and the
Oregon Department of Education
Funded by
the U.S. Department of Education
Office of Elementary and Secondary Education
Title I-C Migrant
Comment:
InTime notetaking support project for Migrant/ESL students in Cyber Space. 

Title:
National Education Association - NEA - Focus On Technology
Text:
Development of Student Acceptable Use Policies
INTRODUCTION
Technology has the capacity to open the doors to a vast world of information resources, as well as people, to any student with an Internet connection. The opportunities to tap those resources are almost limitless. Like the physical world, however, the "virtual" world, requires rules and precautions. School districts have found that, when school communities develop policies that are well understood, broadly circulated, and effectively implemented, the Internet is more likely to be a safe and productive environment for students. While information technology represents a new medium, the framework for defining appropriate behavior should be the school's existing code of conduct.
HOW TO DEVELOP
Local Associations should work with their school boards to develop acceptable use policies (AUPs) regulating student use of school-provided computer network services. AUPs for student use of computer network services should be separate and distinct from those regarding school employee use. In addition, student AUPs should be developed by a committee that represents the various constituencies within the school community.
Computer policy experts state, "Computer use policies cannot succeed unless they represent the institutional culture."1 Thus, teachers, other qualified education employees such as school librarians and media specialists, parents, administrators, and students should be included. Using an inclusive process will garner wide support for the final product and, thus, facilitate compliance and enforcement. Because numerous legal and technological issues will arise, the committee also should consult with legal counsel and a computer network services expert.
KEY ELEMENTS
An effective AUP will have five key elements: (1) a preamble, (2) a definition section, (3) a policy statement, (4) an acceptable uses section, (5) an unacceptable uses section, and (6) a violations/sanctions section. Each of these components is discussed below.2
Preamble
A preamble explains the reasons for the policy, the objectives sought to be accomplished, and the process by which the policy was developed. This component is helpful to the reader because it provides a general backdrop against which the rest of the AUP should be read. This section should explain that the school's existing code of conduct applies to student online activity.
Definition Section
This section identifies and defines key words used in the policy. Murky or confusing policies will not be effective and may result in legal challenges. Certain words -- Internet, E-mail, computer network, educational purpose, personal contact, personal contact information, and other potentially ambiguous terms -- require definition and explanation. The AUP also should avoid "legalese" and use terminology that will be easily understood by students.
Policy Statement
A policy statement should indicate (1) what computer network services are covered by the AUP; and (2) the circumstances under which students can access the computer network services.
Identify the computer network services that are covered by the AUP.
The AUP should designate the computer network services covered. In other words, does the AUP apply to all or some of the following: electronic mail (e-mail), the school's local area network, and /or the Internet? While a few schools have developed separate guidelines for discrete network services, most schools have developed comprehensive AUPs covering all school-provided computer network services. As a practical matter, the latter approach makes more sense since it provides the school community with one uniform policy.
Identify the circumstances under which students can access the computer network services.
As a general rule, schools should strive to provide universal access to all students. Schools, however, may wish to establish different conditions for access based on student grade level. In addition, schools may want to condition student access to services on the completion of a "computer responsibility" class. Providing this educational component is extremely beneficial because it increases student understanding of AUP guidelines and enhances compliance.3 A computer responsibility class also provides an excellent forum to teach students valuable critical thinking skills and an opportunity for them to engage in dialogue on computer use issues that might arise.
Schools, particularly those with a limited number of computer terminals, may also find it necessary to issue rules on where (library, computer lab, classroom), when (study hall, before or after school), and how long (30 minutes, one hour, two hours per day) students can use such services.
In addition to providing access to the school's computer network at school, some schools provide students with "dial-up access," enabling students to access the school's computer network from a personal home computer. While this provides students with greater access to the computer network system, schools should be cautioned that providing dial-up access may result in unsupervised student use.
Acceptable Uses Section
The acceptable uses section should describe and define the appropriate purposes for student use of the school's computer network services. Stated differently, is there a specific purpose for which the school wants to dedicate its computer network services? While a school does not have to dedicate its computer network services to any particular purpose, this could result in unproductive student use. For this reason, many schools limit student use of their computer network systems to "educational purposes."
If a school decides to adopt the latter approach, the AUP should define what constitutes an "educational purpose." This definition could be limited to specific curricular activities. However, as one legal commentator has noted, "this would be equivalent to establishing a school library and then telling students that they can only use the library for class projects."4 An alternative might be to broadly define "educational purposes" to include educational research, career development, and extra-curricular activities.
Unacceptable Uses Section
The unacceptable uses section should provide specific and clear examples of what constitutes unacceptable student use of school-provided computer network services. As a general matter, schools should be concerned with three basic categories:
accessing or receiving information from web sites, chat rooms, or e-mail;
sending or posting information via e-mail, chat rooms, or student web pages; and
"abusing" computer network services.
As a result, the committee should consider the following three policy questions when determining what constitutes an "unacceptable use" of school-provided computer network services:
what kind of computer network sites, if any, should be off limits to students;
what kind of student sending, forwarding, or posting of information, if any, should be prohibited; and
what kind of student behavior will be destructive to the computer network services and should, therefore, be restricted.
While a complete discussion of these three policy questions is beyond the scope of this paper, a few general observations are noted below.
Identify the kind of sites, if any, that are off limits to students.
Adult Sites/Hate Sites/Sites that Promote Violence, or Other Illegal Activities. Many school leaders believe that AUPs should restrict student access to sites that are sexually explicit or promote racism, sexism, or hatred based on religion, national origin, or sexual orientation. They also believe that AUPs should restrict student access to sites promoting violence or other illegal activities such as drug use. Because such restrictions may raise First Amendment questions, 5 a committee should consult with legal counsel if it seeks to include such restrictions.
Chat rooms. Chat rooms are Internet sites where participants converse on a particular subject matter such as antique cars or household hints. Most chat room conversation is innocent, but on-line stalkers often find their victims at these sites. As a result, some schools have banned or otherwise limited visitation to chat rooms.
Term Paper Vendors. Many schools also have banned access to sites providing or selling term papers, book reports, and other forms of student coursework.
Identify the kind of information, if any, that students are prohibited from sending, forwarding, or posting.
Sexually Explicit Messages/Profanity/Harassment/Violence. Many school AUPs restrict the student's ability to send, forward, or post information that is sexually explicit, contains profanity, or defames others. A few schools even restrict the student's ability to send, forward, or post messages that promote violence generally. As noted above, these restrictions may raise First Amendment concerns, and the committee should always consult with legal counsel if it seeks to include such restrictions.
Privacy/Student Safety. Privacy and student safety concerns have led many schools to draft provisions prohibiting students from disclosing personal contact information, including names, photographs, home, school, or work addresses or telephone numbers, social security numbers, or credit card numbers. Some AUPs specify that students cannot disclose their passwords to others.6
Illegal Acts. Most AUPs contain provisions preventing students from using networks to "engage in illegal acts."
Copyright Infringement/Plagiarism. Most AUPs contain provisions prohibiting copyright infringement and plagiarism of online materials. A few AUPs specifically prohibit use of bootleg software, which is software downloaded onto a school computer or network without appropriate registration.7
Commercial Use. Prohibitions on commercial use of school computer network services are very common.
Student Publication of Web Pages. The committee should also consider whether it wants to encourage, or prohibit, student publication of web pages. Web pages can provide students with a valuable forum for self-expression, but school AUPs may include provisions to ensure that web pages conform to existing policies on school publications. In addition, some AUPs include a description of the system by which material is placed on the web page.
Identify prohibited behavior deemed destructive to the computer network services
Viruses/Overloading/Spamming/Hacking. Many AUPs contain provisions broadly prohibiting students from "engaging in any activity that is harmful to the school's computers, computer systems, or networks." Other AUPs specifically mention that students cannot create or propagate computer viruses, overload the school's computer network, engage in "spamming,"8 which is intentionally sending an unnecessary or annoying message to a large number of people, or engage in "hacking," which is intentionally breaking into unauthorized areas of computer networks.
Violations/Sanctions section
A violations section should address how and where a student can report violations of the policy or direct questions about its application. It should also explain the appropriate sanctions for violations. As a practical matter, the AUP may simply provide that violations will be handled in accordance with the school's general student disciplinary code.
Additional Resources
A Legal and Educational Analysis of K-12 Internet Acceptable Use Policies
Intellectual Freedom in Cyberspace
Critiquing Acceptable Use Policies
SCREENING SOFTWARE
In addition to acceptable use policies, some schools also install software that "blocks" or "filters" access to unacceptable sites. There are three basic types of software now available on the market: (1) blocking software, which prevents users from viewing a list of sites deemed inappropriate (by the software manufacturer) but allows access to all other sites; (2) filtering software, which searches the Internet for objectionable words and phrases and blocks access to sites that contain them; and (3) inclusion software, which allows access only to predesignated sites.
NEA has no formal policy on blocking or filtering software, but there are arguments on both sides that bear consideration. Proponents of this software contend that it greatly assists in preventing student access to inappropriate or harmful sites on the Internet. Opponents argue that using such software is censorship.9 They assert that it also places a reliance on barriers, instead of teaching students good judgment and responsible use of computer network services. There is also some research that suggests that such software is not totally effective and actually blocks sites that should be accessible to students.
1Majorie W. Hodges & Steven L. Worona, Legal Underpinnings for Creating Computer Policy, 19 CAUSE/EFFECT 5 (1996), located at CAUSE/EFFECT.
2 NEA does not have an official policy regarding AUPs. This paper is intended to assist local affiliates in the process of formulating effective AUPs. This paper should not be construed as NEA endorsement or condemnation of specific student uses of school-provided computer network services, nor should it be construed as legal advice to any particular local affiliate.
3See Hodges & Worona, supra note 1.
4Nancy Willard, A Legal and Educational Analysis of K-12 Internet Acceptable Use Policies (1996).
5See Urofsky v. Allen, 995 F. Supp. 634 (E.D. Va. 1998) (holding a state law unconstitutional that prohibited state employees from using state-owned computers to access "sexually explicit materials"), rev'd sub nom. Urofsky v. Gilmore, ___ F.3d ____, 1999 WL 61952 (4th Cir. Feb. 10, 1999).
6In addition, many schools include separate AUP provisions notifying students that they do not have a privacy right in e-mail messages in the school computer services network and that the school reserves the right to monitor or engage in routine maintenance of the school computer network. Because monitoring provisions raise various legal issues, a committee should consult with legal counsel regarding such provisions.
7See, e.g., John P. Lynch, School Districts and the Internet: Practice and Model Policy, 122 ED. Law. Rep. 21 (Jan.8, 1998).
8For a definition of "spamming," see What is Spam?
9See Mainstream Loudoun v. Board of Trustees of the Loudoun County Library, No. 97-2049A, 1998 WL 164330 (E.D. Va. April 7, 1998). In this case, a group of adult library patrons challenged the library's "Policy on Internet Sexual Harassment" which required installation of blocking software on all library computers to block "child pornography and obscene material (hard core pornography)" and "material deemed harmful to Juveniles under applicable Virginia statutes and legal precedents (soft core pornography)." Id. at * 1. The library chose X-Stop blocking software to implement its policy. The U.S. Eastern District Court of Virginia held that "the Library Board may not adopt and enforce content-based restrictions on access to protected Internet speech absent a compelling state interest and means narrowly drawn to achieve that end." Id. at * 1. In its decision, however, the court specifically noted that this case involved a public library and adult patrons, not a school library and children.
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back to Technical Briefs listing
Comment:
NEA paper on AUP components 

Title:
Text:
524 - INTERNET ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY
Mankato (MN) Area Public Schools, ISD77
Adopted: February 18, 1997 District 77 Policy 524
Revised: May 5, 1997, February 17, 1998
I. PURPOSE
The purpose of this policy is to set forth policies and guidelines for access to the school district computer system and acceptable use of the Internet.
II. GENERAL STATEMENT OF POLICY
In making decisions regarding student access to the school district computer system and to the Internet, the school district considers its own stated educational mission, goals, and objectives. Electronic information research skills are now fundamental to preparation of citizens and future employees. Access to the school district computer system and to the Internet enables students to explore thousands of libraries, databases, bulletin boards, and other resources while exchanging messages with people around the world. The school district expects that faculty will blend thoughtful use of the school district computer system and the Internet throughout the curriculum and will provide guidance and instruction to students in their use.
III. LIMITED EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE
The school district is providing students and employees with access to the school district's computer system, which includes Internet access. The purpose of the system is not merely to provide students and employees with general access to the Internet. The school district system has a limited educational purpose, which includes use of the system for classroom activities, professional or career development, and limited high-quality, self-discovery activities. Users are expected to use Internet access through the district system to further educational and personal goals consistent with the mission of the school district and school policies. Uses which might be acceptable on a user's private personal account on another system may not be acceptable on this limited purpose network.
IV. USE OF SYSTEM IS A PRIVILEGE
The use of the school district system and access to use of the Internet is a privilege, not a right. Depending on the nature and degree of the violation and the number of previous violations, unacceptable use of the school district system or the Internet may result in one or more of the following consequences: suspension or cancellation of use of access privileges; payments for damages and repairs; discipline under other appropriate school district policies, including suspension, expulsion, exclusion or termination of employment; or civil or criminal liability under other applicable laws.
V. UNACCEPTABLE USES
The following uses of the school district system and Internet resources or accounts are considered unacceptable:
Users will not use the school district system to access, review, upload, download, store, print, post, or distribute pornographic, obscene or sexually explicit material.
Users will not use the school district system to transmit or receive obscene, abusive, profane, lewd, vulgar, rude, inflammatory, threatening, disrespectful, or sexually explicit language.
Users will not use the school district system to access, review, upload, download, store, print, post, or distribute materials that use language or images that are inappropriate to the educational setting or disruptive to the educational process and will not post information or materials that could cause damage or danger of disruption.
Users will not use the school district system to access, review, upload, download, store, print, post, or distribute materials that use language or images that advocate violence or discrimination toward other people (hate literature) or that may constitute harassment or discrimination.
Users will not use the school district system to knowingly or recklessly post false or defamatory information about a person or organization, or to harass another person, or to engage in personal attacks, including prejudicial or discriminatory attacks.
Users will not use the school district system to engage in any illegal act or violate any local, state or federal statute or law.
Users will not use the school district system to vandalize, damage or disable the property of another person or organization, will not make deliberate attempts to degrade or disrupt equipment, software or system performance by spreading computer viruses or by any other means, will not tamper with, modify or change the school district system software, hardware or wiring or take any action to violate the school district system's security, and will not use the school district system in such a way as to disrupt the use of the system by other users.
Users will not use the school district system to gain unauthorized access to information resources or to access another person's materials, information or files without the implied or direct permission of that person.
Users will not use the school district system to post private information about another person or to post personal contact information about themselves or other persons including, but not limited to, addresses, telephone numbers, school addresses, work addresses, identification numbers, account numbers, access codes or passwords, and will not repost a message that was sent to the user privately without permission of the person who sent the message.
Users will not attempt to gain unauthorized access to the school district system or any other system through the school district system, attempt to log in through another person's account, or use computer accounts, access codes or network identification other than those assigned to the user.
Users will not use the school district system to violate copyright laws, or usage licensing agreements, or otherwise to use another person's property without the person's prior approval or proper citation, including the downloading or exchanging of pirated software or copying software to or from any school computer, and will not plagiarize works they find on the Internet.
Users will not use the school district system for the conduct of a business, for unauthorized commercial purposes or for financial gain unrelated to the mission of the school district. Users will not use the school district system to offer or provide goods or services or for product advertisement. Users will not use the school district system to purchase goods or services for personal use without authorization from the appropriate school district official.
If a user inadvertently accesses unacceptable materials or an unacceptable Internet site, the user shall immediately disclose the inadvertent access to an appropriate school district official. This disclosure may serve as a defense against an allegation that the user has intentionally violated this policy. A user may also in certain rare instances access otherwise unacceptable materials if necessary to complete an assignment and if done with the prior approval of and with appropriate guidance from the appropriate teacher.
VI. CONSISTENCY WITH OTHER SCHOOL POLICIES
Use of the school district computer system and use of the Internet shall be consistent with school district policies and the mission of the school district.
VII. LIMITED EXPECTATION OF PRIVACY
By authorizing use of the school district system, the school district does not relinquish control over materials on the system or contained in files on the system. Users should expect only limited privacy in the contents of personal files on the school district system.
Routine maintenance and monitoring of the school district system may lead to a discovery that a user has violated this policy, another school district policy, or the law.
An individual investigation or search will be conducted if school authorities have a reasonable suspicion that the search will uncover a violation of law or school district policy.
Parents have the right at any time to investigate or review the contents of their child's files and e-mail files. Parents have the right to request the termination of their child's individual account at any time.
School district employees should be aware that data and other materials in files maintained on the school district system may be subject to review, disclosure or discovery under Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 13 (the Minnesota Government Data Practices Act).
The school district will cooperate fully with local, state and federal authorities in any investigation concerning or related to any illegal activities and activities not in compliance with school district policies conducted through the school district system.
VIII.INTERNET USE AGREEMENT
The proper use of the Internet, and the educational value to be gained from proper Internet use, is the joint responsibility of students, parents and employees of the school district.
This policy requires the permission of and supervision by the school's designated professional staff before a student may use a school account or resource to access the Internet.
The Internet Use Agreement form must be read and signed by the user and the parent or guardian. The form must then be filed at the school office.
IX. LIMITATION ON SCHOOL DISTRICT LIABILITY
Use of the school district system is at the user's own risk. The system is provided on an "as is, as available" basis. The school district will not be responsible for any damage users may suffer, including, but not limited to, loss, damage or unavailability of data stored on school district diskettes, tapes, hard drives or servers, or for delays or changes in or interruptions of service or misdeliveries or nondeliveries of information or materials, regardless of the cause. The school district is not responsible for the accuracy or quality of any advice or information obtained through or stored on the school district system. The school district will not be responsible for financial obligations arising through unauthorized use of the school district system or the Internet.
X. USER NOTIFICATION
All users shall be notified of the school district policies relating to Internet use.
This notification shall include the following:
Notification that Internet use is subject to compliance with school district policies.
Disclaimers limiting the school district's liability relative to:
Information stored on school district diskettes, hard drives or servers.
Information retrieved through school district computers, networks or online resources.
Personal property used to access school district computers, networks or online resources.
Unauthorized financial obligations resulting from use of school district resources/accounts to access the Internet.
A description of the privacy rights and limitations of school sponsored/managed Internet accounts.
Notification that, even though the school district may use technical means to limit student Internet access, these limits do not provide a foolproof means for enforcing the provisions of this acceptable use policy.
Notification that goods and services can be purchased over the Internet that could potentially result in unwanted financial obligations and that any financial obligation incurred by a student through the Internet is the sole responsibility of the student or the student's parents.
Notification that should the user violate the school district's acceptable use policy, the student's access privileges may be revoked, school disciplinary action may be taken and/or appropriate legal action may be taken.
Notification that all provisions of the acceptable use policy are subordinate to local, state and federal laws.
XI. PARENT RESPONSIBILITY; NOTIFICATION OF STUDENT INTERNET USE
Outside of school, parents bear responsibility for the same guidance of Internet use as they exercise with information sources such as television, telephones, radio, movies and other possibly offensive media. Parents are responsible for monitoring their student's use of the school district system and of the Internet if the student is accessing the school district system from home or a remote location.
Parents will be notified that their students will be using school district resources/accounts to access the Internet and that the school district will provide parents the option to request alternative activities not requiring Internet access. This notification should include:
A copy of the user notification form provided to the student user.
A description of parent/guardian responsibilities.
A statement that the Internet Use Agreement must be signed by the user, the parent or guardian, and a supervising teacher prior to use by the student.
A statement that the school district's acceptable use policy is available for parental review.
XII. IMPLEMENTATION; POLICY REVIEW
The school district administration may develop appropriate guidelines and procedures necessary to implement this policy for submission to the school board for approval. Upon approval by the school board, such guidelines and procedures shall be an addendum to this policy.
The administration shall revise the student and parent notifications, if necessary, to reflect the adoption of these guidelines and procedures.
The school district's Internet policies and procedures are available for review by all parents, guardians, staff, and members of the community.
Because of the rapid changes in the development of the Internet, the school board shall conduct an annual review of this policy.
Legal References: 17 U.S.C. _ 101 et. seq. (Copyrights)
Cross References: District 77 Policy 505 (Distribution of Nonschool Sponsored Materials on
School Premises by Students and Employees)
District 77 Policy 506 (Student Discipline)
District 77 Policy 515 (Protection and Privacy of Pupil Records)
District 77 Policy 519 (Interviews of Students by Outside Agencies)
District 77 Policy 521 (Student Disability Nondiscrimination)
District 77 Policy 522 (Student Sex Nondiscrimination)
District 77 Policy 603 (Curriculum Development)
District 77 Policy 604 (Instructional Curriculum)
District 77 Policy 606 (Textbooks and Instructional Material)
District 77 Policy 804 (Bomb Threats)
District 77 Policy 904 (Distribution of Materials on School District
Property by Nonschool Persons)
INTERNET USE AGREEMENT
STUDENT
I have read and do understand the school district policies relating to acceptable use of the school district computer system and the Internet and agree to abide by them. I further understand that any violation of the policies above is unethical and may constitute a violation of law. Should I commit any violation, my access privileges may be revoked, school disciplinary action may be taken, and/or appropriate legal action may be taken.
User's Full Name (please print):
User Signature:
Date:
PARENT OR GUARDIAN
As the parent or guardian of this student, I have read the school district policies relating to acceptable use of the school district computer system and the Internet. I understand that this access is designed for educational purposes. However, I also recognize it is impossible for the school district to restrict access to all controversial materials and I will not hold the school district or its employees or agents responsible for materials acquired on the Internet. I hereby give permission to issue an account for my child and certify that the information contained on this form is correct.
Parent or Guardian's Name (please print):
Parent or Guardian's Signature:
SUPERVISING TEACHER
(Must be signed if applicant is a student)
I have read the school district policies relating to acceptable use of the school district computer system and the Internet and agree to promote these policies with the student. Because the student may use the Internet on the school district computer system for individual work or in the context of another class, I cannot be held responsible for the student use of the Internet on network. As the supervising teacher I do agree to instruct the student on acceptable use of the Internet and network and proper network etiquette.
Teacher's Name (please print):
Teacher's Signature:
For questions or comments mail to:Doug Johnson
This page last updated July 12, 2002.
Comment:
Mankanto (MN) AUP and contract template 

Title:
MCCSC Acceptable Use Agreement
Text:
IV. Student Access to Networked Information Resources is an addition to Policy and Guidelines 2521 -- Selection of Instructional and Library Media Materials and Equipment and Use of the Internet. It includes this Student / Parent / School Agreement.
Monroe County Community School Corporation
Acceptable Use Agreement
Student Access to Networked Information Resources
Policy and Guidelines 2521
Please read and/or discuss the following with your student. His/her and your signatures are required on the form on page two before an account will be issued to your student.
The Internet
The Internet -- a collection of interconnected computer networks around the world -- expands classroom and library media resources by providing access to information, images, and even computer software from places otherwise impossible to reach. These resources can yield individual and group projects, collaboration, curriculum materials and idea sharing. Internet access also makes possible contacts with people all over the world, bringing into the school, into the classroom, experts in every content area and students and adults from other nations and cultures.
Responsibilities
With this access comes responsibilities. The MCCSC will provide access to and integrate a thoughtful use of such information throughout the curriculum and will provide guidance and instruction in the appropriate use of such materials in a community setting. Parents and guardians are responsible for agreements their children make or actions they take and, outside of school, for setting and conveying the standards their children should follow when using any media or information service. Students are responsible for good behavior on these electronic resources. Appropriate access is the shared responsibility of the school, the student and the family.
Communication on networked information resources is often public. People receiving messages have the ability to redistribute them for many others to read. It is very important that students understand the importance of appropriate and polite behavior and of avoiding the sharing, transmission or distribution of personal information that you would not want any stranger to have -- such as, but not limited to, addresses, telephone and/or social security numbers.
Restrictions
The following activities are not permitted on MCCSC electronic resources:
Accessing, uploading, downloading, transmitting or displaying or distributing obscene or sexually explicit material; transmitting obscene, abusive or sexually explicit language.
Damaging computers, computer systems or computer networks; vandalizing, damaging or disabling the property of another person or organization; debilitating or disabling computers,
systems or networks through the intentional mis- or overuse of electronic distribution or storage space, or the spreading of computer "viruses" through the inappropriate use of files or diskettes.
Violating copyright, or otherwise using another person's intellectual property without his or her prior approval or proper citation; using another person's passwords; trespassing in another person's folders, work or files.
Violating local, state or federal statute.
Rights and Privileges
The student user has full rights (within the limits of these guidelines, responsibilities and prohibitions) to the instructional networked resources provided by the MCCSC. The student's network account provides for personal storage space on the MCCSC resources which may be treated as a student locker and should be cleared periodically. It is important that the students keep passwords secure and private. However, users should not expect that files will always be private. MCCSC network administrators have the right to review files to maintain system integrity and to be sure that the system is being used within the stated limits.
Disclaimers
The MCCSC makes no warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, for the provided access. The staff, the school and the MCCSC are not responsible for any damages incurred, including, but not limited to, loss of data resulting from delays or interruption of service, for the loss of data stored on MCCSC resources, or for personal property used to access MCCSC resources; for the accuracy, nature, or quality of information stored on MCCSC resources or gathered through corporation-provided access; for unauthorized financial obligations incurred through MCCSC-provided access. Further, even though the MCCSC may use technical or manual means to limit student access, these limits do not provide a foolproof means for enforcing the provisions of this policy. All provisions of this agreement are subordinate to local, state and federal statute.
Sanctions
Violations of school and MCCSC networked information resources policies could result in the loss of access to electronic resources. Additional disciplinary action may be determined at the building and/or classroom level in line with existing practice regarding language and behavior (Policy and Guidelines 5600). When appropriate, law enforcement agencies may be involved.
[Effective: January 31, 1996] Page 1
Student name: ________________________________
please print
Monroe County Community School Corporation
Acceptable Use Agreement
Student Access to Networked Information Resources
Policy and Guidelines 2521
Staff Permission: Staff member's name: ____________________________
please print
The above student has my permission to apply for Internet access. Student access will be used to pursue educational objectives through student-conducted communication, research and other instructionally related activities. Alternative activities will be provided if access to networked information resources is refused or unavailable.
Staff Signature: ___________________________ Date: __/__/__
Student and Parent/Guardian Agreements:
Please read and/or discuss the Acceptable Use Agreement on page one (1) with your student. In accepting an account, your student accepts the responsibility of using the network in a responsible and appropriate manner. It is important that you understand his/her responsibilities as well. Your signature indicating that you have read and agreed to the guidelines is necessary before an account will be issued.
I have read, or have had read to me, and/or have discussed the Acceptable Use Agreement and agree to use the network in an appropriate and responsible manner.
Student Signature: _______________________________ Date: __/__/__
I have read and/or discussed the Acceptable Use Agreement with my student and give the school and the MCCSC permission to issue an Internet account to my student.
Parent/Guardian Signature: _____________________________ Date: __/__/__
The MCCSC supports and respects each family's decision whether or not to apply for student access and whether to terminate or suspend that access. Parents/guardians have the right to request alternative activities which do not require access to networked information resources. Access, if issued, shall remain in effect through the remainder of this school year, unless suspended or terminated by either the student, the school, or the parent or guardian.
[Effective: January 31, 1996] Page 2
Policy 2521
Guidelines 2521
Copyright 1996 Monroe County Community School Corporation. All rights reserved. These policy and guideline documents may be copied, adapted or revised for use in educational institutions. Please share your efforts with the MCCSC so that we may adopt and use the best available practices with our students and families.
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Last modified: January 31, 1996
Comments and/or Questions? Email: czager@mccsc.edu
Comment:
Monroe County Missouri APU Template 

Title:
Acceptable Use Policy & Procedures
Text:
Caroline County Public Schools
Acceptable Use of Electronic Networks
It is the general policy of Caroline County Public Schools that network services are to be used in a responsible, efficient, ethical, and legal manner in accordance with the mission of the Caroline County Public Schools. Users of the Caroline County Public Schools network must acknowledge their understanding of the general policy and guidelines as a condition of using the network.
Use of the Caroline County Pubic Schools network services is a privilege, not a right. Failure to adhere to this policy and administrative procedures may result in suspension or revocation of network access. Willful or intentional misuse could lead to disciplinary action or criminal penalties under applicable state and federal law.
Provisions:
1. Acceptable uses of the network are activities which support learning and teaching. Network users are encouraged to develop uses which meet their individual educational needs and which take advantage of the network's functions.
2. Unacceptable uses of the network include, but are not limited to:
Violating the rights to privacy of students or employees of Caroline County Public Schools, or others outside the school system.
Using profanity, obscenity, or other language which may be offensive to another user.
Copying materials in violation of copyright law.
Plagiarizing, which is the taking of someone else's words, ideas, or findings and intentionally presenting them as your own without properly giving credit to their source.
Using the network for financial gain or for any commercial or illegal activity.
Attempting to degrade or disrupt system performance or unauthorized entry to and/or destruction of computer systems and files.
Re-posting personal communications without the author's prior consent.
Revealing home phone numbers, addresses, or other personal information.i.Making personal purchases or unauthorized orders using the Caroline County Board of Education name.
Accessing, downloading, storing, or printing files or messages that are sexually explicit, obscene, or that offends or tends to degrade others. The administration invokes its discretionary rights to determine such suitability.
Downloading or copying information on to disks or hard drives without prior teacher approval.
Violating the policy as outlined in the Caroline County Board of Education Code of Student Conduct.
3. The staff of Caroline County Public Schools will be responsible for:
Teaching students the Caroline County Public Schools Policy and Procedures for Internet Use.
Supervising and guiding student access to the Internet.
4. All users of the Caroline County Public School network services are responsible for adhering to the Caroline County Public Schools Policy and Procedures for Internet Use.
5. The following people are entitled to use the network:
All Caroline County Public Schools staff.
All Caroline County Public Schools students under the supervision of a staff member and/or parent/guardian.
Others who request Guest Accounts from the Network Administrator. These requests will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and will be granted, if warranted, as needs and resources permit.
6. Caroline County Public Schools makes no express or implied warranties for the Internet access it provides. Caroline County Public Schools cannot completely eliminate access to information that is offensive or illegal and residing on networks outside of the Caroline County Public Schools system. The accuracy and quality of information obtained cannot be guaranteed. Caroline County Public Schools will not guarantee the availability of access to the Internet and will not be responsible for any information that may be lost, damaged, or unavailable due to technical or other difficulties. Information sent or received cannot be assured to be private.
Internet Use Procedures
Students may use the Internet in instructional areas where there is teacher or staff supervision. Teachers may allow students to use the Internet in the following ways:
a) Directed Searches
Teachers may work directly with small groups of students or with an entire class. Internet access will be limited to those sites approved by the teacher and previewed in advance, within a week prior to use. Use of directed searches does not require parental permission since the Internet sites will be screened in advance by the teacher. Teachers will be responsible for reviewing the Internet policy and procedures with students prior to any directed searches.
b) Independent Searches
Students wanting to use the Internet for independent educational searches must meet the following criteria:
Students must attend an Internet training workshop where proper Internet behavior and Caroline County's Acceptable Use Policy will be discussed. Parents will be encouraged to attend the training with the student.
An application for Student Internet Access License must be completed by the students and signed by the workshop trainer.
The parent must also sign the application for Student Internet Use.
Elementary students must have a signed form on file with their homeroom teacher. Secondary students will turn their forms into the office and they will receive an Internet Access License for Caroline County Public Schools.
Students wanting to use the Internet will need a completed "Student Assignment Sheet for Internet Use" form with teacher signature and, at the secondary level, a valid Internet Access License.
Students will not be issued Internet e-mail accounts. Educational use of the Internet e-mail can be accessed through the classroom teacher's account. Students engaged in a special project may get group e-mail accounts if requested by the principal.
Comment:
Caroline County, MD 

Title:
AUP Student Contract
Text:
Needham Public Schools
Student Contract for Individual Access to the
World Wide Web
(Please print this form. Once this form has been completed, please return a paper version to the media specialist at your school)
Student Name:
Address:
City: State: Zip:
Telephone Number: ( )
Current School Current Grade:
I understand and will abide by the responsibilities, behaviors and consequences defined in the Acceptable Use Policy (RUP) for the Wide Area Network and Internet access provided by the Needham Public Schools. I further understand that any violation of the regulations (NPS AUP, federal and state law) is a breach of this contract, unethical and may constitute a criminal offense. Should I commit any violation, my access privileges may be revoked, school disciplinary action may be taken and/or appropriate legal action.
User Signature:
Date:
If you are under the age of 18 a parent or guardian must also read this Acceptable Use Policy and sign this agreement.
As the parent or guardian of this student I have read the Acceptable Use Policy for Internet and network access in this document. I understand that this access is designed for educational purposes and the Needham Public Schools has taken available precautions to eliminate controversial material. However, I also recognize it is impossible to restrict access to all controversial materials and I will not hold the Needham Public Schools responsible for materials acquired on the network. I hereby give permission to allow individual access to the network for my child and certify that the information contained on this form is correct.
Parent or Guardian's Name (please print):
Signature:
Date:
AUP FORM May 96 V.2 Web V.1
Return
Comment:
Needham Public School AUP Contract 

Title:
AUP
Text:
NETWORK USER RESPONSIBILITIES
Network users include all students, teachers, administrators, support staff, and community members who have access to the Internet via the World Wide Web and the Needham Public Schools' wide area network.
Students may have access to the Internet via the World Wide Web (WWW) and the Needham Public Schools' wide area network (WAN) while working on class projects in a supervised setting. This includes computers in media centers, classrooms, and computer lab facilities during scheduled class visits. If a student wants/needs to use the WWW or WAN for independent school work, the student and parent must read the Acceptable Use Policy and complete the Contract for Individual Access to the World Wide Web.* Students must follow all rules contained within this policy at all times when using the WAN or the WWW. Students must also follow the direction of faculty and staff members supervising any area where networked resources can be accessed.
*The School Committee delegates responsibility to the Superintendent or his/her designee to develop contracts or other procedural documents.
Security and Safety
Students will demonstrate personal responsibility by agreeing never to get together with someone they meet online without first checking with parents and teachers.
Users will accept the responsibility for keeping all pornographic material, gambling material, inappropriate text files, material dangerous to the health and safety of students and staff, or files dangerous to the integrity of the wide area network from entering the school via the Internet.
Users will demonstrate legal responsibility by not transmitting any material in violation of U.S., Massachusetts, or Needham Public Schools regulations. This includes, but is not limited to: copyrighted materials, threatening, harassing, or obscene material, pornographic material, or material protected by trade secret.
If a user identifies a security problem on the Internet or the NPS wide area network, he/she is responsible to notify a system administrator. Users should not demonstrate the problem to other users. Users should not use another individual's account without written permission from that individual. Security on any computer system is a high priority, especially when the system involves many users.
Students have the responsibility to use computer resources for academic purposes only. Playing games or using networked resources for non-academic purposes is not permitted unless supervised by school staff. Users may not conduct commercial activities for profit, advertise products, or conduct political lobbying on the network.
Users may access home telecommunications accounts from school. However, users need to exercise all responsibilities within this policy, as the NPS network is providing a connection to home accounts.
All users must take responsibility for keeping down costs and avoiding system disruption. No use of this network shall serve to disrupt its use by other individuals or by connecting networks. It is beneficial for all users to keep the network running efficiently.
Property
Users must respect others' privacy and intellectual property. Any traffic from this network that traverses another network is also subject to that network's acceptable use policy (AUP).
Users are responsible for citing sources and giving credit to authors during the research process. All communications and information accessible via the network should be assumed to be private property.
Users will honor the legal rights of software producers, network providers, copyright, and license agreements.
Users have a right to be informed about personal information that is being, or has been, collected about them, and to review this information.
Courtesy or E-Mail Netiquette
Users may encounter web sites which ask for comments or a reply. They may be sending and/or receiving e-mail. Certain communications behaviors have gained acceptance on the network --some because they save misunderstanding and maintain privacy; others because they help users avoid wasting time or help conserve system resources. The NPS Student Contract for Individual Access to the World Wide Web reviews and encourages the use of these safe and appreciated communications behaviors.
Behaviors and Consequences
Appropriate behaviors are outlined in school handbooks and guidelines developed by the Media/Technology Department. Consequences for inappropriate behavior are as follows:
Any violation of the network responsibilities will result in a cancellation of network privileges and may result in disciplinary action. The network administrators will deem what is appropriate use and their decision is final. Also, the network administrators may deny access at any time as required. The administration, faculty, and staff of the NPS may request the network administrators to deny, revoke, or suspend specific user privileges. Any user identified as a security risk or having a history of problems with other computer systems may be denied access to the Internet.
Tampering with computer security systems and/or applications and/or comments will be considered vandalism, destruction, and defacement of school property (see school handbooks).
Vandalism will result in cancellation of privileges and disciplinary action. Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy data of another user, the Internet, or other networks that are connected to the National Science Foundation NET Internet backbone. This includes, but is not limited to, the uploading or creation of computer viruses.
The NPS makes no warranties of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for the services it is providing. The NPS will not be responsible for any damages suffered. This includes loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, mis-deliveries, or service interruptions caused by the school's own negligence or the user's errors or omissions. Use of any information obtained via the NPS is at your own risk. The NPS specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its services.
Return
Comment:
Needham Public Schools AUP 

Title:
Critiquing Acceptable Use Policies by Dave Kinnaman
Text:
Critiquing Acceptable Use Policies
An essay written in June 1995 by Dave Kinnaman
This technological shock to our moral codes means that in the future, we are going to have to teach our children well. -- Howard Rheingold
AUPs on the Scene
Issues Addressed by AUPs
Collections of K-12 Acceptable Use Policies
Individual School's Acceptable Use Policies
Advice from Experts
Logistical AUP Procedures
Whose Acceptable Use Policy Is This?
Does Your AUP Work Against Itself?
Tech Lords at Work
Let the Punishment Fit the Crime
Protecting Children's Rights
Is an AUP the Best Approach?
The Future of AUPs
AUPs on the Scene
As schools increasingly incorporate the Internet into their everyday curriculum, concerned administrators and parents have more opportunities to impose overzealous rules and limitations on teacher and student use of the Net. Some are banning the Internet altogether, fearing disastrous situations. Others are clamping down on access to some Internet resources or tools in an effort to avoid the worst possibilities. This essay reviews the K-12 Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) available on the Internet in June 1995, and draws on teacher and student experience to comment on how AUPs are working today.
Amidst all of this hubbub about controlling access to Internet resources, the American Library Association (ALA) has a long standing and well reasoned opinion that minors should have free access to libraries in an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and free inquiry. Because the Internet is in effect a huge library, many people have suggested the ALA position applies also to minors using the Internet. Most schools are finding a common ground that both deals with the fears instilled in the public by news of isolated abuses, and also deals with the need to avoid censorship while introducing and teaching important technological and ethical concepts. Many of these schools are investigating and writing AUPs.
School AUPs are usually prepared in the form of contracts between the Internet users and their school. At a minimum, they must be written, publicly available statements of official school policy, even if they are not in the form of an agreement. The idea is that it's better to know the rules before one embarks on the road.
Many schools are adopting AUPs, as recommended in Internet RFC 1578 (also known as FYI on Questions and Answers to Commonly Asked "Primary and Secondary School Internet User" Questions) . The AUPs currently available on the Internet provide a means to discover how AUPs are working in schools today and to ask if the AUP format is the best way to address these complicated issues.
Most AUPs deal with multiple issues, frequently attempting to meet all possible concerns. Here are some of the diverse areas covered in Acceptable Use Policies.
AUPs run the gamut from dealing primarily with educating students and their parents to dealing almost exclusively with controlling access to resources. Most K-12 AUPs cover many of these issues. Here are some links to AUPs for you to investigate.
Collections of K-12 Acceptable Use Policies
Newport-Mesa Unified School District, California
UMassK12, University of Massachusetts
AskERIC Virtual Library, New York
Donald Perkins' Texas Studies Armadillo (Gopher) at Houston Independent School District, Texas
Also, by doing a few Veronica, Lycos, and Webcrawler searches for words like "acceptable," "internet," "policy," and "protect," in combination with "child" and/or "school," I found several other specific K-12 AUPs. Here are some of them:
Individual School's Acceptable Use Policies
Kings County Office of Education, California
Taylor Road Middle School, Georgia (link no longer working?)
Dublin School, New Hampshire
Peddie School, New Jersey
Los Alamos Middle School, New Mexico
Socorro Independent School District, Texas (link no longer working?)
New Horizons Governor's School for Science and Technology, Virginia
Bellingham Public Schools, Washington
Advice from Experts
Reviewing these policies and learning from others who have written and dealt with AUP issues is good preparation for writing an AUP. Many wise networking educators, having already wrestled with these issues, are willing to share their expertise. For instance, Clancy Wolf of Educational Service District #114 in Bremerton, Washington shares his knowledge as the "Internet Coordinator" for fifteen school districts. His report is titled "Developing a School or District 'Acceptable Use Policy' for Student and Staff Access to the Internet." In it, he reproduces and critiques three AUP samples adapted from Selma, Indiana; Northville, Michigan; and Hilo, Hawaii to demonstrate different approaches being taken in schools. Mr. Wolf also includes his recommended AUP, which combines features of the others.
Bill Hanson and Sally Laughon have also shared their insights in a speech outline called "Student Drivers on the Internet."
Various writers on this topic agree that in a pluralistic society there are, and should be, a very wide range of belief systems. This leads to a need for tolerance of a vast array of opinions and experiences. So AUPs, then, must serve as a way to moderate and guide us in situations where divergent beliefs come into conflict.
Logistical AUP Procedures
While AUPs can address divergent beliefs, AUPs share many procedural characteristics. Having students and their parents each sign the AUP is universal. Additionally, some districts are including a "sponsoring" teacher signature on each AUP. Some also expect sponsoring teachers to provide specific instruction to their charges. I assume that where librarians or media coordinators exist, they and other professionals are qualified to sponsor student Internet use.
Another preparative step used by many schools is an orientation session for students, parents, teachers, community members and/or others. This orientation and training happens before students are issued an account "login" name and password, or at the same time. The purpose of the session is to discuss concerns and issues addressed in the AUP, and to give preliminary and basic instructions for use of the account.
Each AUP should serve its users' needs. Small middle schools and junior highs getting their first and only modem in the library or media center, for instance, have very different policy needs than large high schools that already have universal student access.
Many AUPs go to special efforts to say that student computer network use while not at school is not the school's responsibility. While it is rarely explicit, I believe this means that schools expect parents to supervise all non-school computer use - whether at home or elsewhere. Avid parental involvement and supervision of student computer use is also recommended by Larry Majid's pamphlet, Child Safety on the Information Highway. Majid says that computers should not become "electronic baby-sitters."
Whose Acceptable Use Policy Is This?
If you already have an AUP, have you asked how it came into existence? Unless the origin of the AUP is credible, it rests on a weak foundation. Students, teachers, parents, and administrators all need to have confidence that their concerns are well represented. Were each of these groups included in the drafting of your AUP?
Does Your AUP Work Against Itself?
Some of the AUPs I found include confusing or offensive rules. Others seem to be written by lawyers for lawyers. To the extent that an AUP is murky, confusing, or belittling it will be less effective.
People will not believe in your AUP unless it is, at least, well written, logical and internally consistent. For example, I found several writing errors in the sample AUPs available on the Internet. Official signature forms, to be taken seriously, should be clear, spelled correctly, and use correct grammar. It is much harder to respect and take seriously a form that shows inattention to communication details.
I also have seen some AUPs that were not consistent within themselves. On one page it might say "Anyone found trying to go to an objectionable site will have their privileges lifted." And two pages later the same AUP might say "Every attempt will be made to warn students and teachers of violations before removing access." Users should have the right to know the possible consequences of misbehavior without unnecessary waffling within the AUP itself: Do I get one warning, or not?
Using the same example, when an AUP says "Anyone found trying to go to an objectionable site will have their privileges lifted," is illogical. Experienced Internet users know that you often do not know the nature of a link before you open it. How can you? Anyone who has used URouLette knows that you simply don't know where you're going to land, and many Web pages have similar links that are intriguing but not well explained. To hold a single mouse-click against a user as an AUP violation is somewhat extreme. This policy, on the other hand, would be quite understandable if it said, "Repeated visits to objectionable sites will elicit a warning. Further attempts will result in a loss of privileges."
Another illogical AUP states that students "should not intentionally obtain copies of ... files ... or data that belong to someone else." On the face of it, this AUP forbids collaborative student projects and sharing of student creative products! They mean, I'm sure, that students should not obtain one another's files without permission, but that is, unfortunately, not what the form actually says.
The most disturbing inaccuracy I found in several AUPs is a confusion of ethical behavior with civility. Typically, AUPs set a high standard of civility by stating a rule that users must be polite in their dealings on the Internet. Then, pages later in the signature block at the end, the student/user is asked to confirm that all violations of these rules are "unethical." The word in the signature block should be "unacceptable" rather than "unethical," because standards of politeness vary greatly and because civility is not the same as being ethical. An unethical act can be performed with extreme politeness and civility, but the act does not become ethical through the addition of civility.
Tech Lords At Work
There is a secret language of technical power talk that is intended to intimidate computer users while confusing them. It is meant to diminish user demands on systems administrators. Some systems administrators and other so-called computer experts use this special jargon to reduce user understanding of computer/network systems, because they mistakenly believe that ignorant users will cause less trouble for them. When faced with these self-appointed threshold guardians of Cyberspace, some new users feel helpless and abandon exploration.
Sometimes in AUPs, systems administrators or systems operators are given the majority of decision making power concerning Internet use. In conjunction with their power, the wording of the AUP may include technical terms or vague generalities that make it difficult to determine what boundaries the policy defines. This type of AUP makes it possible for authorities to revoke Internet priveledges with little or no warning or explanation, leaving users confused and reluctant to explore the Internet.
A bewildering phrase I repeatedly found in the available AUPs is "From time to time, (named school) system administrators will make determinations on whether specific uses of the network are consistent with the acceptable use policies." What does this mean? If it means "We reserve the right to change these rules as we learn new information?" why not just say so?
If the ground rules are open to change, shouldn't it also say that any proposed changes will be announced before they are implemented so that users can always know the rules they are expected to follow?
And, sadly, some folks, whom I refer to as Tech Lords , take to ruling over the use of the Internet. Listen to this Tech Lord proclaim:
"Based on the acceptable use guidelines outlined in this document, the system administrators will deem what is inappropriate use and their decision is final."
In addition to these types of proclamations, some policies actually stress that there is no appeal process available.
Are Tech Lords using your AUP to unnecessarily accrue power and reserve authority to themselves? Are they using vague language in your AUP to unnecessarily keep users at a distance? One way to tell is to ask them what they mean by a confusing statement in the AUP. If the system administrator becomes defensive or changes the subject, this is not a good sign. If, on the other hand, they explain in simpler terms, try to get those simpler terms used in the AUP! A useful AUP will be understandable rather than intimidating to its users.
Let the Punishment Fit the Crime
While clarity on what you will be punished for has not been reached, the punishments are remarkably similar across all K-12 AUPs: they all say you'll lose your Internet account, temporarily or permanently. And maybe you'll also be criminally prosecuted, and/or be processed through the school discipline system. Another punishment that I haven't seen enacted but may fit the crime is the use of the network printer. Many teachers say that often the evidence of Internet misbehavior is found at the network printer. It seems appropriate for AUP punishments to include routine printer cleaning and maintenance, purchasing printer paper, recycling toner cartridges, or other natural consequences of network printer misuse.
Protecting Children's Rights
Several AUPs acknowledge the human rights of student computer network users. The child's right to privacy is mentioned. The AUP at the Peddie School in New Jersey acknowledges students' "legitimate needs (including experimentation)."
Interestingly, I found some advice that deals openly with certain child abuse concerns by carefully emphasizing to the student that many troublesome events are not the victim's (child's) fault. Larry Majid's insightful pamphlet, Child Safety on the Information Highway, was written in association with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Howard Rheingold's directions to his own child carefully reinforce several additional important elements for children using computer communication.
What about duplicity and perversity? Many AUPs warn students not to accept e-mail messages without some skepticism as to their source and to their content. Messages can be forged, and people do deceive.
Just like in real life in our home communities, there are also outrageous, profane, appalling, detestable and repugnant expressions and displays on the Internet. People can sometimes be obnoxious, insulting, rude, or exploitative on the Net. Children should have some idea of how to respond to these circumstances if they occur.
Is an AUP the Best Approach?
The following quotation was written by Jennifer D. Barovian, an avid computer network user who recently graduated from high school and received an award in a national contest for an essay about her own use of the Internet since eighth grade, Could this be a Modem? She is working this summer as an Internet trainer at Case Western Reserve University, pending her freshman year of college beginning in September, 1995. In an exchange of several e-mail messages, I asked her views on how one could tell if students might be ready for access to the Internet, and I asked further about her position that age-based restrictions ignore the maturity of the individual child. I pointed out one of the well-known risqué areas, and asked when she was allowed to exercise her own maturity with access to that risqué location. In her careful reply she directs me back to the real purpose and educational value of the Internet:
"The Internet is exactly like real life, in regards to the availability of information... A student could, for instance, learn how to make a bomb from someone online -- but he could gain the same knowledge from a chemistry book, so does that mean we have to ban books and stop teaching science, too?"
"Of course not. It's just human nature to fear and protect against something we don't understand. It's too bad that there are still so many who distrust the Internet, rather than being open to comprehending the advantages."
Jamieson McKenzie makes a similar argument when he says (in the June 1995 edition of his Web newsletter From Now On, ) in the article Protecting Our Children From the Internet (and the World), that the Internet has the same risks found everyday on your cable TV, printed in your local newspaper, or delivered to your postal mail box. I would add libraries and telephones to the list of comparable risks. The Internet is every bit as risky as your public telephone or library.
McKenzie also makes an excellent point when he reminds us that the best goal is for children to attain self-control.
"As children mature, we begin to rely less and less upon physical barriers, trying to teach them to respect boundary lines and values without being tied down, locked in or physically blocked from entry. We expect our children to begin exercising judgment and restraint."
"This expectation only makes sense as the young person begins moving toward adult life. Self control is an essential element in the development of an independent, well-balanced adult member of society. We hope and expect that our children will begin to adopt certain values as their own, 'internalizing' a distaste for cruelty, for greed, for wanton destruction, for dishonesty and for other things we have identified as negatives. At the same time, we hope they will come to cherish certain traditions, behaviors and attitudes which we hold dear."
Howard Rheingold, author of the influential book The Virtual Community presents similar ideas in his article Why Censoring Cyberspace is Futile. Here is a brief quote from the article:
"Yes, we have to think of ways of protecting our children and our society from the easy availablity of every kind of abhorrent information imaginable. But the 'censor the Net' approach is not just morally misguided. It's becoming technically impossible. As Net pioneer John Gilmore is often quoted: "The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it."
"The Net's technological foundation was built to withstand nuclear attack. The RAND Corporation designed the network to be a throughly decentralized command- and-control communications system, one that would be less vulnerable to intercontinental missles than a system commanded by a centralized headquarters."
"This decentralization of control means that the delivery system for salacious materials is the same worldwide one that delivers economic opportunity, educational resources, civic forums, and health advice. If a hacker in Helsinki or Los Angeles connects to the Internet and provides access to his digital pornography files, anybody anywhere else in the world, with the right kind of Internet connection, can download those steamy bits and bytes."
"This technological shock to our moral codes means that in the future, we are going to have to teach our children well. The locus of control is going to have to be in their heads and hearts, not in the laws or machines that make information so imperviously available. Before we let our kids loose on the Internet, they better have a solid moral grounding and some common sense."
The Future of AUPs
As a final contribution, I would like to paraphrase another brilliant idea shared with me by teenage Internet expert Jennifer Barovian: It may be that we shall soon see a different attitude, and we may need different approaches to Acceptable Use Policies, because students are now increasingly required to participate in an Internet curriculum. Until quite recently, voluntary initiative was the basis of educational involvement in the Internet. But now there may be less personal choice available to students, and perhaps our AUPs will need to be adjusted for this new reality.
Good words of advice: We need to take a look at why and how we write and implement AUPs to ensure the successful use of the Internet for learning.
Back to the top of this essay
Critiquing Acceptable Use Policies was written in 1995 by Dave Kinnaman.
In 1996 Dave co-authored the book Researching On The Internet with Toronto broadcast journalist and author Robin Rowland.
In 1997 Dave wrote a book for K-12 schools, a "How-to" for AUPs. The publisher tried to edit it to scare people about the Net in order to sell additional copies of blocking software. Dave refused, and withdrew the book. It has not yet been published. Also in 1997 Dave mirrored the Peacefire teen anti-censorship site, ensuring that his Internet Service Provider is entirely blocked. During 1997 he also created the official Texas Internet Service Provider Association's (TISPA's) web page for blocking software, to meet requirements of Texas state law: http://www.Io.Com/~kinnaman/pchealth/draft.html
Readers are welcome to write to Dave at <kinnaman@world.std.com>
Version 6.1
Last revised on 20 Jan 98
This page resides at http://www.io.com/~kinnaman/aupessay.html
Copyright © 1995,1996,1997,1998, Dave Kinnaman, all rights reserved.
16910
Comment:
Kinnaman review of AUPS 

Title:
NMCTE Selected Acceptable Use policy ResourcesInternet Use Policies
Text:
Internet Use Policies
Here is a list of Internet Appropriate Use Policies developed by other organizations. These links are provided as a service by NMCTE for school districts trying to develop an Appropriate Use Policy. We encourage New Mexico schools to submit their AUP for inclusion. For more information contact John Chadwick chadwick@nmmnh-abq.mus.nm.us.
If you are wondering why schools should go to the trouble to develop an acceptable use policy, please check out What you need to know about developing an Acceptable Use Policy. For a critique on AUPs, check out the editorial by Dave Kinnaman. Dave's page contains links to K-12 Acceptable Use Policies.
School sites
Bellingham, WA
California Schools
COE College in Cedar Rapids, IA
Houston Independent School District
Florida State University
Leon County Public Schools
State of Indiana Acceptable Use Policies
American Library Association
Public Libraries
Spokane, WA Public Library
St. Joseph County, Indiana
K-12 Internet AUP resource site
Technology Resources
Child Safety on the Internet
The Internet Advocate
Cyber Patrol
FROM NOW ON -- The Education Technology Journal
Culture in Cyberspace
The Well Connected Educator
Please send comments about this page and developing site to Kurt Steinhaus, kurt@sde.state.nm.us
Last Update 25 Jan 1997 SLP
Comment:
New Mexico page on Internet Acceptable use. 

Title:
Acceptable Internet Use Policies - A Handbook, Virginia Department of Education
Text:
COMPONENTS
A well-written Acceptable Use Policy focuses on responsible use of computer networks, including the Internet, and access and transmitting of information to K-12 classrooms and the library media center. Most Acceptable Use Policies include the following components:
-a description of the instructional philosophies and strategies to be supported by Internet access in schools
-a statement on the educational uses and advantages of the Internet in your school or division
-a list of the responsibilities of educators, parents, and students for using the Internet
-a code of conduct governing behavior on the Internet
-a description of the consequences of violating the AUP
-a description of what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable use of the Internet
-a disclaimer absolving the school division, under specific circumstances, from responsibility
-a statement reminding users that Internet access and the use of computer networks is a privilege
-a statement that the AUP is in compliance with state and national telecommunication rules and regulations
-a signature form for teachers, parents, and students indicating their intent to abide by the AUP
Click on the following links to see examples of the various components of an AUP.
Internet Advocate
Librarian’s Information Online Network: Internet Forum
Public School Internet AUP
Safekids
Teen safety on the Information Highway
Internet Learning Partners
Rice University
Netizen
Acceptable Use Policies
Library Policy Development for Internet Access in the School Environment
Development of Student Acceptable Use Policies-From the National Education Association
A Legal and Educational Analysis
Armadillo's WWW Server
SEIRTEC/SREB Appropriate Use Policies
SAMPLE AUPS
In preparing your AUP, it is helpful to review AUPs from other schools or divisions. They can be used as a template for creating your own AUP. Be certain to modify them as necessary to fit your particular need.
Click on the following links to see AUP's from both Virginia schools, schools throughout the nation, and professional organizations.
Policies in Virginia
All school divisions are required to have an Acceptable Use Policy. Many school divisions have their policies posted on their Web sites. This site contains links to each school division that has a Web page open to the public: http://www.pen.k12.va.us/Div/#Schl
Policies from other states
New Mexico Council of Technology Education: Internet Use Policies
Armadillo’s WWW Server
Needham Public Schools-Student Contract
Caroline County, Maryland
TEMPLATES
A signature form for teachers, parents, and students indicates their intent to abide by the AUP. Such forms are vital to the successful implementation of your AUP. Click on the following links to see examples of signature, consent, or release forms and agreements.
Monroe County Missouri Public Schools
Owen J. Roberts School District
Mankato Area Public Schools
INTERNET SAFETY AND FILTERING ISSUES
The following are links to information regarding Internet safety and filtering. Click on the links below to see some of the many options that are currently available. Links to both the federal and state legislation are included.
Safe Kids
Child Safety on the Information Highway
By Lawrence J. Magid
(c) 1998 National Center for Missing and
Exploited Children
The Internet and Public Libraries.... Issues and Opportunities (This information is not just for public libraries. There is information about filtering and Internet safety that is applicable for any school library.
FilteringInfo.ORG
Safeguarding the Wired Schoolhouse
The Consortium for School Networking
N2H2
Virginia General Assembly Internet Filtering Law for Virginia Public and Private Schools
Virginia schools are required to implement filtering in public schools by July 1, 2001 according to newly enacted state law.
Link to amended law:
Federal Internet Filtering Law and Regulations for E-Rate Recipients
The Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) requires schools and libraries receiving E-Rate discounts for Internet access and internal connections to comply with the Act.
On April 5, 2001 the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued regulations for schools and libraries receiving non-telecommunications E-Rate discounts.
For information regarding filtering software, the following table may provide guidance:
MethodDescriptionSoftware
Proxy Server AUP Action Tools, FAIR, BESS,I-Gear, Smart Filter, WebSense
Blocking, with limited accessBlocking is from a list, or my parent/educators specified listCyberPatrol
Blocking, Stealth MonitoringBlocks access for a list, parents can not add or change items on listCyberSittter2000, Disk Tracy, Internet Filter Suite
Blocking with controlled accessBlocks from a list, parents can monitorSearchlight, Hexabit Junior, Gulliver' , SOS Kid Proof,
Stealth MonitoringMonitors activities using a contextual text recognition systemCyberSentinel, SentryCam, Smart Alex ICU, Spector, WinGuardian, WinWhatWhere,
Controlled accessDegree of control can be monitored for each userEdmin, KidDesk Internet Safe, Mama Bear, WebWhacker
Hardware deviceBlocks Internet access without disabling the computerNet Protector
BlockingBlocks objectionable sites, can be customizedNetNanny SurfWatch, X-Stop
Blocking, monitoringUser defined boundariesOmniQuad, SafeNet
Blocking and rating systemA rating system that can be customized by the individuals and has a listing of ratings based on information about the web that is provided to a companySafe Surf
Comment:
State of Virginia DOE- Components of Acceptable use policies 

Title:
Network Acceptable Use Policy
Text:
Network Acceptable Use Policy
Internet Use/Computer Use Agreement
Revised: 05/97
Please Print:
Student's Last name ______________
First Name _____________________
Grade _________
Home Phone __________
The use of the Internet at the New Horizons Governor's School for Science and Technology is very special. It is the result of a tremendous amount of time, money, and commitment invested by local NASA personnel and by the teaching staff of New Horizons. The use of computer technology and Internet access is an integral part of the mission of the Governor's School. Your child will learn Internet communication skills including the following: email, ftp (downloading files), telnet, WWW, keyword searches, etc.
Students are expected to follow all guidelines stated below as well as those given orally by the staff and to demonstrate ethical behavior in using the network facilities. Students are also expected to realize that the opportunity to use the network and the New Horizons' facilities go hand in hand with using computer hardware, software, and the Internet in a responsible manner. Furthermore, students should realize that network use (e.g. WWW, email, etc.) is logged and is subject to administrative monitoring/review at any time. Any actions that might harm the computer equipment or software, or impair its effective use, or showing disregard for the following proper procedures set up for network access will NOT be tolerated.
1) Before use, all students must attend a presentation on the aspects of security and ethics involved in using the New Horizons network (HorizonNet).
2) Students may not allow others to use their account name and/or their password. Violation of this rule could jeopardize your access to the Internet and students who violate this rule will immediately lose all network computer access and risk expulsion from their class.
3) Students may not play computer games at any time.
4) The use of the network for commercial purposes is forbidden.
5) Parents must understand that their child may encounter material in a network/Bulletin Board/chat room that they may consider inappropriate (vulgar jokes, statements of belief that some may consider immoral, pornography, etc.). The student is responsible for not pursuing material that could be considered offensive.
Since there are multiple computers in the classroom for student access, then as the parent/guardian of _________________________________, I understand that the staff of New Horizons can not monitor all of the information my child is accessing or downloading while in the classroom nor while the child is away from the school. However, both my child and I understand that the accessing of (or saving of) inappropriate material will not be tolerated. Any accessing of inappropriate material, or any misuse of the network, will result in loss of privileges in using the network at New Horizons and may result in academic penalties including the risk of expulsion from the Governor's School.
Parents should feel free to call the Governor's School staff at 766-1100 to address any concerns they may have about their child's access to the Internet.
Before using the network at New Horizons, both the student and a parent/guardian must sign below indicating that you and your child are aware of and agree to abide by the requirements above along with the student behavior guidelines of the New Horizons Regional Educational Center.
________________
Student Signature
________________
Parent Signature
______________
Date
________________
Parent's Work phone
Thank you for your thoughtful attention to these matters.
Dr. Edward W. Carr
Director
Back to:
The Governor's School
New Horizons' Home Page
Comment:
Policy at a Governor's School - New Horizon 

Title:
Bitpipe: Guide to Internet Usage and Policy
Text:
Title: Guide to Internet Usage and Policy
[View this Document]
Published: December 1, 2000
Company: Elron Software, Inc.
(View All Company's Documents)
Language: English
Type: White Paper
Format: PDF
Length: 30 Page(s)
Abstract: We all know the benefits of the Internet – new markets, distribution channels, levels of customer service. The Internet has become an invaluable business asset – but on employees’ desktops it can be a liability. Valuable corporate data is at risk in the billions of e-mails exchanged daily. Easy access and high-speed Internet connections make shopping, on-line trading and random surfing tempting distractions. Business-critical networks are strained with non-business related activities, and new avenues of corporate liability are open with the display and exchange on inappropriate material. With a policy in place, and software to monitor and report on compliance, you can ensure that the Internet is used as a constructive, business-enhancing tool. This 30-page Guide explains how to create a policy to manage web and e-mail usage as well as enforce it using Elron Software's Internet Manager family of Internet Policy Management solutions. Specific content includes: · Corporate Internet Usage Statistics · Internet Usage Policy Guidelines · Internet Usage Policy Template.
Subject(s): Acceptable Use Policies | Internet Usage
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Comment:
White Paper abstract 

Title:
Acceptable Use Policies
Text:
Armadillo's WWW Server
Acceptable Use Policies
With Internet access becoming more and more common within our schools, it is clear that a clear set of guidelines for the use of the resources that this access provides are needed for the guidance of the students, teachers, adminstrators, parents, and board members in developing and understanding policy regarding these resources. HISD's Armadillo--The Texas Studies Gopher began collecting such resources a number of years ago. More and more material that is helpful in this effort is becoming available. Educators should become familiar with this material before limiting access or establishing policy to minimize the risk of controversy and litigation.
Acceptable and Unacceptable Use of Net Resources from Armadillo
Acceptable Use Policies: Defining what's allowed online, and what's not From Classroom Connect December 1994/January 1995.
Houston Independent School District's Acceptable Use Policy and sample student agreement in Spanish and English.
The HISD Acceptable Use Policy
A Sample AUP Form in English
A Sample AUP Form in Spanish
The New York Times Communications Decency Page A bibliography of materials on the issues from the NY Times.
Netparents.org A website with resources to assist parents in making decisions regarding the Internet.
The Internet Filter Assessment Project Very good. The Internet Filter Assessment Project ran from April to September, 1997. It was a volunteer project involving close to 40 librarians, all told. The project manager was Karen G. Schneider, a government librarian and library-press columnist.
The PICS Homepage The Platform for Internet Content Selection effort is a cross-industry working group whose goal is to facilitate the development of technologies to give users of interactive media, such as the Internet, control over the kinds of material to which they and their children have access.
Censorship and the Internet Maintained by Paul Burton, Strathclyde University, Scotland, UK.
Children Accessing Controversial Information We hope to form a community of people interested in discussing these issues and developing helpful materials. The home page and subscription information to the caci listserv that is maintained by Brendan Kehoe of the Zen Internet Group.
From Now On The Educational Technology Journal Jamie McKenzie's From Now On contains numerous articles and materials related to Acceptable Use Policy.
Filtering the Web: a TAle of Fishnet Stocking and Swiss Cheese From Jamieson McKenzie's From Now On
The Internet Advocate. A Librarian's attempt to provide material for decision-making.
Appropriate use policy and other access policy and procedure from the excellent Bellingham, Washington Server
Sex, Censorship, and the Internet Carl M. Kadie, who is associated with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, is an attorney who has gathered a good deal of case law and best practice information in this excellent discussion.
The CoVis Network Use Policy and the thinking behind its development.
Child Safety on the Information Highway.
Ballad of an Email Terrorist GSN's Al Rogers spells out some ways of dealing with unwelcome, obscene email to a youth.
ON A SCREEN NEAR YOU: CYBERPORNTime Magazine July 3, 1995, Cover Story by Phillip Elmer-Dewitt. It's popular, pervasive and surprisingly perverse, according to the first survey of online erotica. And there's no easy way to stamp it out.
The Cyberporn Debate The Time Article cited above started a great debate: This site contains an excellent depository of information regarding this debate.
Marketing Pornography on the Internet by Marty Rimm. The Study that prompted the Time Article above.
A Detailed Analysis of the Conceptual, Logical, and Methodological Flaws in the Article: "Marketing Pornography on the Information Superhighway" July 2, 1995 (version 1.00) Donna L. Hoffman & Thomas P. Novak Associate Professors of Management Co-Directors, Project 2000 Owen Graduate School of Management Vanderbilt University
A Detailed Critique of the TIME Article: "On a Screen Near You: Cyberporn (DeWitt, 7/3/95)" July 1, 1995 (version 1.01) Donna L. Hoffman & Thomas P. Novak Associate Professors of Management Co-Directors, Project 2000 Owen Graduate School of Management Vanderbilt University
A Preliminary Discussion of Methodological Peculiarities in the Rimm Study of Pornography on the "Information Superhighway" June 28, 1995 David G. Post Visiting Associate Professor of Law Georgetown University Law Center Dpost@eff.org, or Dpostn00@Counsel.com
Comments from the Well Media Conference regarding the July 3 Time Article Jim Thomas, Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at Northern Illinois University.
INTERNET: FIRE STORM ON THE COMPUTER NETS A new study of cyberporn, reported in a TIME cover story, sparks controversy. Times' article regarding the flurry of discussion that started following their article on the Rimm Study. From the July 24, 1995 article.
Time Magazine's Letters to the Editor From the July 24, 1995 issue. Most of these letters deal with the Cyberporn Story.
Special Focus: The Cyberporn Fallout. Computer-Mediated Communication Magazine ISSN 1076-027X / Volume 2, Number 8 / August 1, 1995
Surfwatch Information regarding one of the new clients that blocks access to sites deemed inappropriate.
K12 Acceptable Use Policies from Nancy Willard at Internet Marketing Services. An excellent overview of the problems, pitfalls, and solutions.
Censorship, Freedom of Speech, and Child Safety on the Internet
Armadillo's Editorial Regarding the Need for a Solution The fun part is only available for Netscape 1.1N browsers with "server push." (Thanks to Multimedia Resource Company--webmaster@mmrcorp.com)
Back to Armadillo's Home Page
armadillo@rice.edu
url http://www.rice.edu/armadillo/Rice/Resources/acceptable.html
January 6, 1998
Comment:
Armadillo School Texas Site, lots of links, annotated regarding Internet AUP